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Speculations for introducing into Ireland the Genevese emi-

grants—An asylum granted in the county of Waterford to

22

Plan and constitution of the town of New Geneva - Secretary

-

Hamilton's letter to Mr. D’Ivernois

A sum of 50,000l. granted to the new settlers

24

Earl of Northington succeeds the Earl Temple, The Irish vo-

lunteers meditate a plan for a reform of parliament

The meeting of volunteer delegates at Lisburne, and resolutions

of the meeting

26

A committee of correspondence appointed at Lisburne-Ad-

dress of the said committee

28

A circular letter addressed from Belfast to the friends of par-

liamentary reform in England

30

Resolutions of the Ulster Volunteer Association gratuitously

circulated throughout the kingdom

33

Various letters and resolutions upon the same subject

36

The new parliament meet-Mr. Pelham, secretary to Lord

Northington--Mr. Perry speaker-The lord lieutenant's

speech to both houses

39

The address of thanks to the crown voted unanimously-A

vote of thanks to the volunteers for the preservation of good

order

41

A vote of thanks moved to the Earl Temple-Opposed by Mr.

Adderly and two others

42

Sir Henry Cavendish moves that the condition of the country

demands every species of retrenchment and economy 43

The rival orators, Flood and Grattan, maintain contrary opinions

-Both ordered into custody on account of their intemperate

language

43

Mr. Blood resumes the necessity of economy by a statement

of the rapid increase of the public debt-Long debates upon

the motion

44

Mr. Grattan's speech against the reduction of the expences for

46

Sir Henry-Cavendish brings again his motion of retrenchments

-Seconded by Mr. Mason and the attorney general 47

Mr. Flood proposes an amendment—The amendment lost af-

ter a violent debate

47

Mr. Beresford gives a minute detail of the customs 48

Minister animadverts

upon

the concourse of people round the

house when the protecting duty bill was moved

50

A petition from the council of the chamber of commerce-Dis.

cussion upon the propriety of such a measure, Note 50

Various opinions upon the volunteer associations

51

Mr. Flood moves for leave to bring in a bill for a more equal

i representation in parliament

52

His motion lost by a great majority-Diversity of opinions be-

tween Flood and Grattan

65

His majesty's answer to the address of both houses--Fox's In-

dia bill effects the change in the cabinet, Note

65

The changes in the British cabinet occasion an adjournment of

the Irish parliament

66

The speaker's address to the lord lieutenant on presenting the

67

Various loans raised by reason of a great deficiency in the re-

venues-Lord Northington resigns—The Duke of Rutland

appointed-Mr. William Brabazon Ponsonby moves an ad.

dress to Lord Northington, expressive of the regret of the

nation upon his quitting the vice-regency-Carried 68

Mr. Gardiner moves the address to the Duke of Rutland 71

Thirteen petitions from counties and populous boroughs, pray-

ing for a reform in parliament Enquiry into the conduct of

the commissioners of the Linen Hall moved for-Motion

agreed to

71

General Luttrell moves for a bill to prevent the houghing of

soldiers

72

Leave given-Mr. Flood's motion for a parliamentary reform

74

Major (now General) Doyle's objection to the bill

75

Mr. Grattan's observations

After a long debate the bill rejected

78

Messrs. Grattan and Gardiner's speeches uoon the revenue and

commerce of Ireland alluded to-Riotous disposition of the

people of Dublin upon the rejection of the measure of reform

-The printers and publishers of the Irish Herald and Even-

ing Chronicle, upon the motion of Mr. Foster, ordered to the

bar

79

Resolutions censuring the Lord Mayor of Dublin's conduct

Sir John Blaquiere's paving bill

80

The bill opposed by the mob calling themselves the aggregate

body- The recorder reprobates the tendency of the bill 81

Mr. Foster brings in a bill for restraining the licentiousness of

the press General Luttrell's declaration, and likewise that

of Mr. Gardiner, Note

82

Lord Hilwarlin's motion for a special address to the lord lieu.

tenant, approving his conduct-Virulent debates upon this

subject

84

The address carried by a decided majority—The address, Note

85

Mr, Griffith moves for an address to his majesty, expressive of

the distresses of the manufacturers, &c.—The address amend.

ed by Mr. Foster-Passed

86

The lord lieutenant prorogues parliament-His speech to both

houses

87

Tarring and feathering practised-Sheriff of Dublin wounded

in the act of dispersing a riotous mob

88

The sheriffs of Dublin preside at a meeting of the inhabitants

of the metropolis-Resolutions of the said meeting 89

Address to the people of Ireland

90

A petition to his majesty

94

The petition presented by the sheriff to the lord lieutenant, and

answer thereto

96

Henry Stephens Reilly, sheriff of Dublin, fined and imprisoned

by sentence of the King's Bench-A petition from the inha-

bitants of Belfast to Mr. Pitt, and his answer thereto-A pre-

tended letter of Lord Kenmare handed about, conveying the

sentiments of the Roman Catholics, Note

97

The volunteers disunite in opinion of admitting the Catholics

to a participation of rights

97

A national congress is considered of—The meeting of the city

_The

of Dublin for electing delegates is opposed by the attorney

general, who threatens the sheriffs The sheriffs who preside

at these meetings and the printers and publishers of the re-

solutions are prosecuted

98

The national congress meets 25th October, 1784— The despe-

rate rabble shew themselves anew in the county of Kilkenny,

assuming the title of the White Boys—Suppressed by the ef-

forts of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Ossory_A letter of

thanks from the Castle to the Rev. Dr. Troy, Bishop of Os-

sory, for his laudable conduct

99

A second meeting of the delegates at Dublin-The parliament

of England meet 25th August, 1784— The king's speech re-

commends the settlement of all differences with Ireland

The lord lieutenant's speech to the parliament of Ireland up-

on its meeting 20th Jan, 1785

100

An amendment proposed to the address---Rejected 101

Sir Edward Crofton's qualifying bill opposed by the Castle

Mr. Pitt's declaration in the British House of Commons for

a reform of parliament, Note

102

Mr. Orde lays before the house the heads of a commercial set-

tlement between Great Britain and Ireland

104

The original propositions at full length

105

All the resolutions regarding commerce agreed to, and the chan-

cellor of the exchequer moves for an address to his majesty

-The resolutions of the lords and commons of Ireland

pre-

sented to the British House of Commons, and Mr. Pitt's

speech

107

The concessions to be made to Ireland as proposed by Mr.

Pitt

109

Ireland bound to pay in return of the above concessions a cer-

tain yearly sum, &c.—Lord North and Mr. Fox oppose the

concessions

109

The merchants and manufacturers examined as well in the

committee as at the bar of the British house-Sixty-four pe.

titions presented against the Irish commercial propositions

110

Mr. Pitt's new propositions, twenty in number. The new pro-

positions at full length

111

The fourth proposition affords matter for the most interesting

debates

116

Mr. Burke's picture of Ireland, and Mr. Fox's observations

upon Mr. Orde's propositions, Note-Upon a question of

adjournment, the minister carries it

117

The propositions pass the House of Commons--In the House

of Lords they are debated- The Marquis of Lansdowne's

speech thereon

118

Earl Fitzwilliam's remarks upon a resolution of the British

House of Lords in 1782

121

Lord Townshend supports the propositions

122

The propositions pass, upon a division 84 against 30-After

a debate upon the amendments made by the lords, Mr. Pitt

brings in a bill founded upon them-The bill read a first

time-Both houses address the king

124

Mr. Secretary Orde moves the commons of Ireland to bring in

a bill copied from that of the British parliament–The prin-

ciples of the bill opposed by the patriots, who all unite upon

this occasion

125

After a violent debate, leave is given to bring in the bill by a

majority of 19 only—The bill is dropped, and public illumi-
nations, &c.—Mr. Flood proposes a resolution, which is
evaded by a motion of adjournment by the Secretary Orde-

Extract from Mr. Curran's speech in the Debate, Note 126

Mr. Pery resigns the chair-Mr. Foster elected

127

Upon the motion of Mr. Daly, thanks voted to Mr. Pery, and

an address to the king in his behalf-Lord Headford moves

for an address of thanks to the Duke of Rutland

128

The address after some remarks from Mr. Grattan voted— The

lord lieutenant's address to both houses

130

The duke loses his popularity-Causes thereof

131

The duke meets parliament 19th Jan. 1786

132

Mr. Ogle sates the danger resulting from a Mr. O'Connor's

conduct-an account of this man

134

Mr. Conolly and several other men of influence join the oppo-

sition—Increase of the national debt

134

The patriots attack the pension list-Mr. Forbes's motion op-

posed by Sir Hercules Langrisbe, Mr. Mason, Mr. George

Ponsonby, the attorney general-Supported by Grattan and

Curran

135

The Dublin police bill is introduced

137

Mr. Conolly opposes the bill-Several petitions against the bill

-A very animated one from the city of Dublin

138

Rejected as an insult to the house. The parliament prorogued

139

Parliament met-The commercial treaty with France-Laid

before the house--Mr. Conolly makes observations upon that

part of the address alluding to disturbances, and accuses the

administration of fomenting them

140

Mr. Longfield denies the existence of any serious troubles

An account of Captain Right

141

Sir James Cotter asserts the existence of riots-Mr. Curran

speaks against that part of the address animadverted upon by

Mr. Conolly, and concludes his speech by moving certain

amendments

142

Fitzgibbons, the attorney general, makes a report upon the rise

and progress of the troubles

144

Tithes and parish cesses, &c. the object of these reformers 145

The attorney general concludes by moving for a bill to render

such proceedings in future a capital offence

146

The price of daily labour inadequate to the support of the poor

-Murmurs against jobs and profligate expenditure of the
public monies-Mr. Conolly announces his intention of mov-
ing in the course of the session an alteration in the hearth
money-Mr. Monk Mason and all the treasury bench op-

147

The attorney general brings in a bill for preventing tumultuous

risings, &c.-The bill is opposed by the patriots 147

Mr. Grattan's speech upon the occasion, Note

148

The cause for demolishing Catholic chapels abandoned by the

attorney general

149

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