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" Custom is the most certain mistress of language, as the public stamp makes the current money. But we must not be too frequent with the mint, every day coining. Nor fetch words from the extreme and utmost ages; since the chief virtue of a style is perspicuity,... "
Specimens of English Prose Writers: From the Earliest Times to the Close of ... - Page 422
by George Burnett - 1807
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Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the ..., Volume 2

American Academy of Arts and Letters - 1910
...certain Mistress of Language as the publicke stampe makes the current money,'' adding as a caution, "but we must not be too frequent with the mint, every day coyning." Our treasury is enriched when we take over needed terms from abroad and reissue them stamped...
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The Theory of Poetry in England: Its Development in Doctrines and Ideas from ...

Richard Pape Cowl - Poetics - 1914 - 319 pages
...But we must not Neologisms- be too frequent with the mint, every day coining, nor fetch Archaisms- words from the extreme and utmost ages ; since the chief virtue of a style is gersgicuity^ and nothing so vicious in it as to need an interpreter. Words borrowed of antiquity do...
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English and Engineering

Frank Aydelotte - Engineering - 1917 - 390 pages
...are little more than a literal translation from the Latin author last named. " Custom," said he, " is the most certain mistress of language, as the public stamp makes the current money." But, like Quintilian, he was careful to define what he meant by this supreme authority. " When I name custom,"...
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The Literary Essay in English

Eleanore (Sister Mary) - American essays - 1923 - 260 pages
...educational, political, and historical. In the very interesting essay on style he says of diction: "Custom is the most certain mistress of language, as the public stamp makes the current money. . . . Words borrowed of antiquity do lend a kind of majesty to style. . . . But the eldest of the present,...
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Effective Revenue Writing: Advanced course

United States. Internal Revenue Service - English language - 1961
...flatulent statement when he sees it. How about this for economy of statement and solidity of counsel ? "The chief virtue of a style is perspicuity, and nothing so vicious in it as to need an interpreter." Or this : "Our composition must be more accurate in the beginning and end than in the middle, and in...
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Effective Revenue Writing: Advanced course, by C. D. Linton

United States. Internal Revenue Service - English language - 1961
...flatulent statement when he sees it. How about this for economy of statement and solidity of counsel ? "The chief virtue of a style is perspicuity, and nothing so vicious in it as to need an interpreter." Or this : "Our composition must be more accurate in the beginning and end than in the middle, and in...
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Effective Revenue Writing, 2: An Advanced Course Designed to Help ...

Calvin Darlington Linton - English language - 1962 - 198 pages
...flatulent statement when he sees it. How about this for economy of statement and solidity of counsel ? "The chief virtue of a style is perspicuity, and nothing so vicious in it as to need an interpreter." Or this : "Our composition must be more accurate in the beginning and end than in the middle, and in...
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Power in Verse: Metaphor and Metonymy in the Renaissance Lyric

Jane Hedley - Literary Criticism - 1988 - 199 pages
...the Elizabethan poets, is "customary." "Custom," he explains (again making direct use of Quintilian), "is the most certain mistress of language, as the public stamp makes the current money."22 The coinage analogy suggests that by "custom" he would be understood to mean not only "common...
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The Cambridge Companion to Spenser

Professor of English Andrew Hadfield, Andrew Hadfield, Hadfield Andrew - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 278 pages
...claim that archaisms 'lend a kind of majesty to style', Jonson stresses the importance of 'custom': Custom is the most certain mistress of language, as...perspicuity, and nothing so vicious in it, as to need an interpreter.10 It could be objected that the glossary to The Shepheardes Calender illustrates the need...
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The English Renaissance: An Anthology of Sources and Documents

Kate Aughterson - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 608 pages
...most certain mistress of language, as the puhlic stamp makes the current money, But we must not he too frequent with the mint, every day coining. Nor fetch words from the extreme and unnost ages, since the chief virme of a style is perspicuity, and nothing so vicious in it as to need...
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