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" This power, like all others vested in congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges no limitations other than are prescribed in the constitution. "
Supreme Court Reporter - Page 321
by United States. Supreme Court - 1903
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John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court

R. Kent Newmyer - BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY - 2001 - 511 pages
...or compromise, or so it seemed: "This power [over commerce], like all others vested in congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution. ... If, as has always been understood, the sovereignty of congress, though limited to specified objects,...
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Law and the Web of Society

Cynthia L. Cates, Wayne V. McIntosh - Political Science - 2001 - 272 pages
...an invalid usurpation of federal authority. The power to regulate interstate commerce, he wrote, is "complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the Constitution." This understanding grants Congress a great deal of latitude in all commercial regulatory matters. Left...
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Law and Markets in United States History: Different Modes of Bargaining ...

James Willard Hurst - Business & Economics - 2010 - 207 pages
...fulfilled Marshall's early reading, that the commerce power, "like all others vested in Congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...acknowledges no limitations other than are prescribed in the Constitution."70 That an act of Congress will predictably have local effects as well as effects on...
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Madison V. Marshall: Popular Sovereignty, Natural Law, and the United States ...

Guy Padula - History - 2002 - 208 pages
...precise affinity" to an enumerated power stands in opposition to Marshall's argument that the power can "be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges no limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution."66 Although there can be no doubt that Madison would have agreed with the majority's...
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John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court

R. Kent Newmyer - BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY - 2001 - 511 pages
...utmost extent, and acknowledges no limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution. ... If, as has always been understood, the sovereignty of congress, though limited to specified objects, is plenary as to those objects, the power over commerce with foreign nations, and...
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Constitutional Culture and Democratic Rule

John Ferejohn, Jack N. Rakove, Jonathan Riley - History - 2001 - 414 pages
...governed" (Gibbons, 196). Marshall continued, "[t]his power, like all others vested in Congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges 3 In a widely noted article. Robert Gordon argued that historicism, which he defined as "the recognition...
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The Big Gamble: The Politics of Lottery and Casino Expansion

Denise Von Herrmann - Political Science - 2002 - 148 pages
...Interstate Commerce Clause of the US Constitution: "This power, like all others vested in Congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution." It is also clear that the states are considered primary in the regulation of activity deemed to be...
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Narrowing the Nation's Power: The Supreme Court Sides with the States

John T. Noonan Jr. - History - 2002 - 212 pages
...to John Marshall's decision in Gibbons v. Ogden: "The power, like all others vested in Congress is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution." The court did not have to accept Congress's word for it, but once the court had found that Congress...
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Constitutional Government: The American Experience

James A. Curry, Richard B. Riley, Richard M. Battistoni - Civil rights - 2003 - 625 pages
...Marshall's well-known words from Gibbons v. Ogden, that the power of Congress over interstate commerce "is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations other than are prescribed in the Constitution. ..." The opinion placed responsibility for assessing the motive and purpose of legislation with the...
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The Waite Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy

D. Grier Stephenson - Law - 2003 - 349 pages
...states did not stop at state lines but "may be introduced into the interior." The power to regulate was "complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the Constitution." Though the states retained authority to enact inspection, pilotage, and health laws, even here Congress...
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