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" This power, like all others vested in congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges no limitations other than are prescribed in the constitution. "
Supreme Court Reporter - Page 321
by United States. Supreme Court - 1903
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The Supreme Court and American Constitutionalism

Bradford P. Wilson, Ken Masugi - Law - 1998 - 298 pages
...prescribe the rule by which commerce is to be governed. This power, like all others vested in Congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution. It is not intended to say that these words comprehend that commerce, which is completely internal,...
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Copyright Law Symposium

American Society of Composers - Law - 1998 - 480 pages
...States."187 The Supreme Court has held that this power is "plenary and complete in itself'188 and that it "may be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges no limitations other than are prescribed in the Constitution."189 Given this broad mandate, Congress would appear to face little difficulty finding...
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John Marshall: Definer of a Nation

Jean Edward Smith - Biography & Autobiography - 1998 - 800 pages
...introduced into the interior." He went on to say that Congress's power to regulate commerce was complete and "may be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges no limitations," other than those prescribed in the Constitution itself. The chief justice said it was obvious that the power to...
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Hearing on H.R. 100, H.R. 2370, and S. 210: Hearing Before the Committee on ...

USGPO Staff, United States, United States. Congress. House. Committee on Resources, Usgpo - Guam - 1998 - 527 pages
...respect to the Commerce Power TUB (-power [the Commerce Power], like all others vested in Congress is in itself, may be exercised to its utmost extent, and acknowledges no . other fhjn arc prescribed in the contfitutioo. (Emphasis added.) mb-i limitation on the plenary legislative...
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Litigating Federalism: The States Before the U.S. Supreme Court

Eric N.. Waltenburg, Eric N. Waltenburg, Bill Swinford - Law - 1999 - 160 pages
...Day warned in Hammer, seemed to have come to pass: The power of Congress over interstate commerce "is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...acknowledges no limitations, other than are prescribed by the constitution." Gibbons v. Ogden (9 Wheat. 1 [1824]). That power can neither be enlarged nor...
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Law 101: Everything You Need to Know about the American Legal System

Jay M. Feinman, Distinguished Professor of Law Jay M Feinman - Law - 2000 - 353 pages
...to define "regulate." Marshall determined that "This power, like all others vested in Congress, is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution itself." Thus the Court concluded that Congress had constitutional authority to regulate commercial...
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Politics and Constitutionalism: The Louis Fisher Connection

Robert J. Spitzer - Political Science - 2000 - 285 pages
...the states, 93 and, as Marshall stated in Gibbons v Ogden, each of Congress's delegated powers "is complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...limitations, other than are prescribed in the constitution." 94 Hammer v Dagenhart was directly at odds with Marshall's position. It rested on the view that Congress...
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Monopolies in America: Empire Builders and Their Enemies from Jay Gould to ...

Charles R. Geisst, Ambassador Charles a Gargano Professor of Finance Charles R Geisst, Charles R.. Geisst - Foreign Language Study - 2000 - 355 pages
...involved. But the Supreme Court disagreed. In 1824 Marshall wrote that the power of the commerce clause was "complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...acknowledges no limitations, other than are prescribed in the Constitution."13 The Fulton monopoly was broken, interstate transportation was given an immediate boost....
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Railway Problems

William Z. Ripley - Business & Economics - 2000 - 436 pages
...The power of Congress to regulate commerce among the several states is supreme and plenary. It is " complete in itself, may be exercised to its utmost...extent, and acknowledges no limitations, other than arc prescribed in the Constitution." Gibbons v. Of/den, 9 Wheat. 1, 196, 6 L. ed. 23, 70. The conviction...
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Constitutional Revolutions: Pragmatism and the Role of Judicial Review in ...

Robert Justin Lipkin - Law - 2000 - 366 pages
...government's legitimate power to regulate commerce among the states was plenary. Consider Marshall's words: "If, as has always been understood, the sovereignty of congress, though limited to specified objects, is plenary as to those objects, the power over commerce with foreign nations, and...
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