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" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
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The Emergence of the English Author: Scripting the Life of the Poet in Early ...

Kevin Pask - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 218 pages
...sad, sober cheer. Poetry is to be religion made vocal" (435). The stated purpose of The Faerie Queene, "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (407), marks Spenser's own investment in this reformation of poetic authority. In the longer term,...
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Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship, and Sexualities in ...

Jeffrey Masten, Masten Jeffrey - Drama - 1997 - 223 pages
...Brathwait's, in gentlemen's conduct books; The Faerie Queene, for example, the "generall end [of which] is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," devotes a book to the subject. 7 Other treatments - for example, Bacon's "Of Friendship" and Florio's...
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Reason Diminished: Shakespeare and the Marvelous

Peter G. Platt - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 271 pages
...genre affords the best means of achieving his end: in this "plausible and pleasing" form he aspires "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." He hopes to have an ethical effect even though fiction tends to be read "rather for variety of matter,...
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The Story of All Things: Writing the Self in English Renaissance Narrative ...

Marshall Grossman - History - 1998 - 347 pages
...indicates that Spenser's text begins (like lago) with the pursuit of an end: "the general1 end . . . of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (p. 167), but it also (infinitely) defers the implementation of this program by launching the phantom...
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Chivalry and Exploration, 1298-1630

Jennifer R. Goodman, Jennifer Robin Goodman - History - 1998 - 234 pages
...philosophers, Lodowick Bryskett and Piccolomini. In fact, the virtues Spenser tackled first in his project "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" had found a place in earlier "mirrors of knighthood" as well. Alain Chartier's fifteenth-century "Breviaire...
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The Later Tudors: England, 1547-1603

Penry Williams - History - 1998 - 606 pages
...'Letter to Ralegh', appended to The Faerie Quee-ne, claimed that he had written with two ends in view: 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline', and to praise Elizabeth, for 'in that Faery Queene I meane glory in my general intention, but in my...
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Trash Culture: Popular Culture and the Great Tradition

Richard Keller Simon - Social Science - 1999 - 189 pages
...college examinations. He wanted to change his audience by delighting and instructing, and so did Lucas. "The generall end therefore of all the booke is to...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," Spenser wrote in his prefatory letter to The Faerie Queene. He tells us there that he selected historical...
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A Brefe Dialoge Bitwene a Christen Father and His Stobborne Sonne: The First ...

Wolfgang Capito, William Roy - Humor - 1999 - 305 pages
...Protestant ideology contained within and integral to the romance form. Spenser says it best himself: 'The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceived shoulde be most pausible and pleasing, being...
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The New Poet: Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints

Richard Danson Brown - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 293 pages
...Spenser explains that his poem is 'a continued Allegory, or darke conceit' in which 'The general! end ... is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline'. 67 This 'end' is obtained through an 'historical! fiction', based around Prince Arthur in the manner...
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The Cambridge History of Early Modern English Literature

Muller Janel, David Loewenstein, Janel Mueller, Mueller, Janel M. Mueller, William Rainey Harper Distinguished Service Professor Emerita Janel Mueller - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 1038 pages
...general! end therefore of all the book', wrote Spenser in his prefatory letter to the 1590 edition, 'is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline.'5* The Faerie Queene is an openly didactic poem, yet nothing demonstrates so well the old...
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