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" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
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Introduction to English Literature: With Suggestions for Further Reading and ...

Franklin Verzelius Newton Painter - English literature - 1906 - 700 pages
...would otherwise have remained obscure. " The generall end, therefore, of all the booke," he says, " is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. ... I chose the historie of King Arthure, as most fit for the excellencie of his person, beeing made...
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The Complete Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser - Poetry - 1908 - 852 pages
...gealous opinions and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading therof, (being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention...the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person ill vertuous and gentle discipline : which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing,...
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The Complete Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser - Poetry - 1908 - 852 pages
...(being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention and meaning, which in the 10 , That they lay scattred over all the land, As thicke...seeing so to rage, Willd him to stay, and signe of tofashiou a gentleman or noble person in Tortuous and gentle discipline : which for that I conceived...
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The Great English Letter Writers, Volume 2

William James Dawson, Coningsby Dawson - Letter-writing - 1908
...your better light in reading thereof, (being so by you commanded) to discover unto you the generall intention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof...without expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents therein occasioned. The generall end therefore of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman...
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Lives of Great English Writers from Chaucer to Browning

Walter Swain Hinchman, Francis Barton Gummere - Authors, English - 1908 - 569 pages
...as " a continued Allegory, or darke conceit," must have its general intention clearly set forth : it is " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Such a moral, the poet goes on, should be " coloured with an historical] fiction, the which the most...
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Romance and Revolution: Shelley and the Politics of a Genre

David Duff - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 276 pages
...there is, in addition, an echo of Spenser's famous remark that the purpose of The Faerie Queene was ' to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline', 40 an aim that can be identified with the vision of an ideal prince which extends over the whole poem...
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The Specter of Dido: Spenser and Virgilian Epic

John Watkins - Poetry - 1995 - 208 pages
...and Acrasia signal Spenser's own resistance to romance conventions that might subvert his aspirations "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" ("A Letter of the Author to Sir Walter Raleigh"). This book explores the intertextual phenomenon that...
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Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture

Margreta de Grazia, Maureen Quilligan, Peter Stallybrass - Literary Collections - 1996 - 398 pages
...printed in the first edition of The Faerie Queene in 1590, Spenser declares that "the generall end ... of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Spenser claims both a moral duty and a rhetorical power to inform and reform the subjectivities of...
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Polliticke Courtier: Spenser's The Faerie Queene as a Rhetoric of Justice

Michael F. N. Dixon - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 245 pages
...with a Castiglionian «arraffo21 for the epic expressed in Spenser's letter to Raleigh: "The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in verruous and gentle discipline." That "end" is rhetorically complex since the "noble person" he aims...
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"The White Horse" and Other Stories

Emilia Pardo Bazan, Emilia Pardo Bazán (condesa de) - Fiction - 1993 - 163 pages
...in a fashion analogous to Caxton's Prologue, Spenser specifies that "The generall end" of his book "is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (LR). 16 He declares that he is following "all the antique Poets historical!, first Homere, who in...
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