Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
Full view - About this book

Monthly Packet

1888
...setting forth of her knights upon the adventures, described in the previous books. His object, he says, is ' to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline,' and following, as he considers, Homer, Virgil, Ariosto and Tasso ; this he purposes to do by means...
Full view - About this book

Transcripts and Studies

Edward Dowden - Criticism - 1888 - 525 pages
...Spenser the best suited and the most needful to his own time; his end, as he declared to Raleigh, was " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." He desired to see at the head of affairs in England a company of noble Englishmen serving for no selfish...
Full view - About this book

The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, Part 9

William Dwight Whitney - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1889
...against whom, as he hid already of the party for whom, he was to fight. Sir P. Sidney, Arcadia, i. The generall end therefore of all the booke is to...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. Spenser, To Ealeigh, prefixed to FQ Why, my lord of York commends the plot and the пенfrai course...
Full view - About this book

The Andover Review, Volume 14

Religion - 1890
...but embodied qualities." Spenser certainly has a most serious purpose, which he states as follows : " The generall end therefore of all the booke is to...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. ... I labour to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave Knight, perfected in...
Full view - About this book

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Volume 4

Modern Language Association of America - Philology, Modern - 1889
...auoyding of gealous opinions and mifconstructions, as alfo for your better light in reading thereof, to discover unto you the general intention and meaning, which in the whole courfe thereof I have fafhioned." I see no reason for doubting SPENSER'S words as to his purpose in...
Full view - About this book

The Shepheardes Calender, Volume 3

Edmund Spenser - 1890 - 104 pages
...gealous opinions and misconstructions, as for your better light in reading thereof, ... to discover vnto you the general intention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned. . . ." Had he thought it wise to disclose his name in 1579, he would have commenced his preface in...
Full view - About this book

Publications of the Spenser Society, Issue 1, Part 1

Spenser Society - English literature - 1890
...gealous opinions and misconstructions, as for your better light in reading thereof, ... to discover vnto you the general intention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned. . . ." Had he thought it wise to disclose his name in 1579, he would have commenced his preface in...
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 1

Edmund Spenser - Poetry - 1891
...therof, (being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention and meaning, winch in the whole course thereof I have fashioned, without...purposes, or by accidents, therein occasioned. The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle...
Full view - About this book

Friendship the Master-passion

Henry Clay Trumbull - Friendship - 1891 - 413 pages
...And when it is remembered that Spenser declares it to be the "generall end " of his greatest poem " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," who can doubt that the ideal before his mindy was this friend Sidney, who had then no equal in this...
Full view - About this book

The Chautauquan: Organ of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle

1891
...manner, when Edmund Spenser, five hundred years later, desired to write a poem, the end of which was " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," he chose the history of King Arthur, " as most fitte for the excellency of his person, being made famous...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF