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" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
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Religion, Allegory, and Literacy in Early Modern England, 1560-1640: The ...

John S. Pendergast - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 187 pages
...final causes, both of them defined by the court and courtly rhetoric. He writes first, 'The general end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Later Spenser makes it clear that the true final cause is Queen Elizabeth: "In that Faery Queene I...
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The Faerie Queene, Book Five

Edmund Spenser, Abraham Stoll - 2006 - 224 pages
...fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes or by accidents therein occasioned. The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: 2 Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible 3 and pleasing, being coloured ivith an historicall...
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Edmund Spenser: New and Renewed Directions

J. B. Lethbridge - Literary Collections - 2006 - 385 pages
...concept of holiness. The most stunning gesture in The Faerie Queene occurs when Spenser writes that "the generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline,"31 and then he begins that program of virtuous fashioning by saying...
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Allegory, Space and the Material World in the Writings of Edmund Spenser

Christopher Burlinson - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 256 pages
...of The Faerie Queene. Spenser declares in the letter, of course, that his 'generall end' in the book is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceiued shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall fiction, the which...
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Shakespeare's Christianity: The Protestant and Catholic Poetics of Julius ...

E. Beatrice Batson - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 178 pages
...holy scripture as it is in classical mythology and courtly romance tradition; this book's "end ... is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline."17 Elsewhere I have shown that even the most rabid Renaissance anti-theatricalists structured...
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Critical Essays on Shakespeare's A Lover's Complaint: Suffering Ecstasy

Shirley Sharon-Zisser - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 203 pages
...Spenser's Legend of Chastity, the dream of which is to fulfill the 'general! end' of The Faerie Queene: 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' (Letter to Ralegh). Specifically, Shakespeare's young man appears to be modeled not only on the Marlovian...
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Renaissance Figures of Speech

Sylvia Adamson, Gavin Alexander, Katrin Ettenhuber - History - 2007 - 306 pages
...Queene have to be understood. In his outline of the work, the 'Letter to Ralegh', he explains that 'The generall end therefore of all the booke is to...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline.' 35 He does this by presenting exemplary characters, like Britomart, Calidore, and the other knights;...
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The Myth of Sisyphus: Renaissance Theories of Human Perfectibility

Elliott M. Simon - History - 2007 - 614 pages
...creative action rather than temporal achievement. Spenser's poetic vision of human perfectibility, "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," is based on an imaginative series of reconstructions of the myth of Sisyphus and its archetypal idealization...
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The Poetry of Praise

J. A. Burrow - Literary Criticism - 2008
...been surprised, I think, to read what Spenser said to Raleigh about his chief intention in the poem: 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' by exemplifying 'the twelve private morall vertues, as Aristotle hath devised'. Insofar as the Faerie...
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