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" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
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Poetry, Symbol, and Allegory: Interpreting Metaphorical Language from Plato ...

Simon Brittan - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 226 pages
...gealous opinions and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading thereof, (being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention...fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes or by-accidents therein occasioned. Darkness and light are traditional exegetical terms: spiritual ignorance...
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Philaster: Or, Love Lies A-Bleeding by Beaumont and Fletcher

Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 142 pages
...course 1 In the letter to Raleigh explaining the plan of his book Spenser wrote: 'The general! end ... of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. . . I labour to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave knight, perfected in...
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Shakespeare, Spenser and the Contours of Britain: Reshaping the Atlantic ...

Joan Fitzpatrick - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 182 pages
...misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading therof, (being so by you commanded,) to discouer vnto you the general intention and meaning, which in the...fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes or by-accidents therein occasioned. (Spenser 1977, 737) Colin Clout's Come Home Againe, "a post-1590 revision...
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Science, Reading, and Renaissance Literature: The Art of Making Knowledge ...

Elizabeth Spiller - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 214 pages
...historical one, it does allow us to take seriously the fictive presumption that the end of the book is to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." "Noble person" is perhaps a broader category than "gentleman," but it is not necessarily one that includes...
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Shelley and the Chaos of History: A New Politics of Poetry

Hugh Roberts - Literary Criticism - 2010
...borrowed stanzaic form. The Revolt, like The Fairie Queene, is a romance.'1 Spenser writes his famous poem "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Shelley writes his to "awaken the feelings, so the reader should see the beauty of true virtue, and...
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Humanism, Machinery, and Renaissance Literature

Jessica Wolfe - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 305 pages
...mortal flesh and the debilities of a human soul, Spenser's Talus complicates The Faerie Queene's project to fashion a "gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," for his inhuman constitution and his barbarity reveal the potentially dehumanizing effects of that...
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Spenser's Monstrous Regiment: Elizabethan Ireland and the Poetics of Difference

Richard A. McCabe - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 306 pages
...established in Ariosto and Tasso but ingeniously adapted to a crusade far closer to home. To attempt 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' in an Irish context was to confront a people who were 'all Papistes by theire profession but in the...
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The Faerie Queene, Book Six and the Mutabilitie Cantos

Edmund Spenser, Abraham Stoll, Andrew Hadfield - Poetry - 2006 - 264 pages
...ofgealous opinions and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading thereof, (being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: 2 Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible^ and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall...
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The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four

Edmund Spenser, Dorothy Stephens - 1915 - 496 pages
...dispersed" (48). This decentralizing is foreshadowed in "The Letter to Raleigh" -when Spenser -writes, "The generall end therefore of all the booke is to...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Whereas Machiavelli, Castiglione, and Elyot write manuals for the fashioning of princes and courtiers,...
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Before Intimacy: Asocial Sexuality in Early Modern England

Daniel Juan Gil - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 187 pages
...Queene; in the epic's prefatory letter to Sir Walter Raleigh, Spenser famously claims that "the general end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." 1 But if The Faerie Queene is a conduct manual, then it is a very strange one for, as a genre, conduct...
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