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" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
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Woods Lanyer: Woman Poet C

Susanne Woods - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 198 pages
...blazing and defining the national virtue. Spenser declares the "general! end" of The Faerie Queene to be "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," with "noble person" gender neutral. ("A Letter of the Authors ... to ... Sir Walter Ralegh" [usually...
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A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture

Michael Hattaway - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 786 pages
...literature. In a letter to Ralegh about The Faerie Queene. Edmund Spenser acknowledges that his aim is 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' ('Letter of the Author's'). NOTES Stone, (1964). p. 43; Cressy, p. 17. All further references to this...
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Defending Literature in Early Modern England: Renaissance Literary Theory in ...

Robert Matz - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 188 pages
...The poet as Medina The "generall end" of The Faerie Queene, Spenser writes in the letter to Ralegh, is to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline."1 Given the multiple definitions of aristocratic conduct available to Spenser, however,...
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Spenser's Supreme Fiction: Platonic Natural Philosophy and The Faerie Queene

Jon A. Quitslund - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 373 pages
...that will concern me in the next chapter and subsequently. chapter three The Poet as Magus and Viator 'The generall end therefore of all the booke is to...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline.' In this familiar statement and throughout 'A Letter of the Authors,' the poet emphasizes that his subject...
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Guilty Creatures : Renaissance Poetry and the Ethics of Authorship ...

Dennis Kezar Assistant Professor of English Vanderbilt University - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 280 pages
...Ralegh, "the general intention & meaning" of his allegory, "which in the whole course thereof I haue fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes or by accidents therein occasioned." The author who realized in this letter "how doubtfully all Allegories may be construed," and who sought...
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Renaissance and Reformation, 1500-1620: A Biographical Dictionary

Jo Eldridge Carney - Biography & Autobiography - 2001 - 417 pages
...elements receive fullest expression in the complicated allegory of The Fairie Queene, whose purpose "is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," according to the letter to Raleigh. Each of the six books portrays the growth of a Christian Knight...
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Paradigms Found: Feminist, Gay, and New Historicist Readings of Shakespeare

Pilar Hidalgo - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 162 pages
...his study (in a letter to Sir Walter Ralegh, Spenser had defined the purpose of The Fairie Queene as "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline") (l69). Given the complexity and scope of Spenser's work, the critic selects one episode (the destruction...
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Eating Their Words: Cannibalism and the Boundaries of Cultural Identity

Kristen Guest - Social Science - 2001 - 219 pages
...that destruction, Spenser thus found an ideal metaphor for the total renunciation of lust necessary "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." NOTES 1. Faerie Queene quotations come from AC Hamilton's edition (London: Longman, 1977). 2. Waldo...
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The Cambridge Companion to Spenser

Professor of English Andrew Hadfield, Andrew Hadfield, Hadfield Andrew - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 278 pages
...and stature. In The Faerie Queene he presumes to school the community of his social superiors in how 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' ('A Letter of the Authors'), but Spenser himself came from modest, non-gentle stock. His Westminster...
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Enabling Engagements: Edmund Spenser and the Poetics of Patronage

Judith Owens - Poetry - 2002 - 183 pages
..."lewd deeds." What must be especially galling, given that Spenser's avowed aim in The Faerie Queene is to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (Letter to Ralegh, 737), is the bardic appropriation of "praises which are proper unto virtue itself."...
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