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" In no country perhaps in the world is the law so general a study. The profession itself is numerous and powerful ; and in most provinces it takes the lead. The greater number of the deputies sent to Congress were lawyers. But all who read, and most do... "
The Eloquence of the British Senate: Being a Selection of the Best Speeches ... - Page 299
by William Hazlitt - 1809
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The Law Reporter [microform]

Thomas Kennedy Ramsay, L. S. Morin - Law - 1854 - 186 pages
...where he descrihes the American character and speaks of their addiction to legal studies. He says, M in no country perhaps in the world is the law so general a " study. The profession itself u numerous and powerful; and in most H provinces it takes the lead. The greater numher of the deputies...
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The Roman Law: A Lecture Delivered by Frederick William Torrance, Esquire ...

Frederick William Torrance, McGill University. Faculty of Law - Roman law - 1854 - 29 pages
...he describe* the American character and speaks of their addiction to legal studies. He says, " fn na country perhaps in the world is the law so general a '* study. Tne profession itself is numerous and powerful; and in most " provinces it takes, the lead. The greater...
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SELECT BRITISH ELOQUENCE

Chauncey Allen Goodrich - 1856
...another circumstance in our colonies, which contributes Education. ' , , no mean part toward the growth which the real spirit of the laws will not justify."...or recovered from so desperate a condition, while Congress were lawyers. But all who read, and most do read, endeavor to obtain some smattering in that...
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The Law Magazine and Law Review: Or, Quarterly Journal of ..., Volume 6

Law - 1859
...time. He observed of that country, that there was probably no other in the world where the law wa* so "general a study. The profession itself is numerous...provinces it takes the lead. The greater number of tho deputies sent to the Congress were lawyers. But all who read — and most do read — endeavour...
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The Most Eminent Orators and Statesmen of Ancient and Modern Times ...

David Addison Harsha - Orators - 1857 - 520 pages
...Burke, " to add another circumstance in our colonies, which contributes no mean part toward the growth and effect of this untractable spirit — I mean their...the lead. The greater number of the deputies sent to Congress were lawyers. But all who read, and most do read, endeavor to obtain some 17 smattering in...
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History of Civilization in England, Volume 1

Henry Thomas Buckle - England - 1858
...Speech, in Parliamentary History, vol. xviii. p. 495 ; or in Burke's Works, vol. ip 188. He says': " lu no country perhaps in the world is the law so general...lead. The greater number of the deputies sent to the Congrepg were lawyers. But all who read, — and most do read, — endeavour to obtain some smattering...
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The Works of Edmund Burke: With a Memoir, Volume 1

Edmund Burke - English literature - 1860
...circumstance in our colonies, which contrihutes no mean part towards tho growth and effect of this untractahle i num her of the deputies sent to the congress were lawyers. But all who read, and most do read, endeavour...
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The Pulpit of the American Revolution: Or, The Political Sermons of the ...

John Wingate Thornton - United States - 1860 - 537 pages
...effect of this untractable spint, — I mean their education. In no country in the world, perhaps, is the law so general a study. The profession itself...numerous and powerful, and in most provinces it takes the load. The greater number of the deputies sent to the congress" — at Philadelphia — "were lawyers....
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The Pulpit of the American Revolution: Or, The Political Sermons of the ...

John Wingate Thornton - United States - 1860 - 537 pages
...said, " to add another circumstance in our colonies, which contributes no mean part towards the growth and effect of this untractable spirit, — I mean their education. In no country in the world, perhaps, is the law so general a study. The profession itself is numerous and powerful,...
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The Pulpit of the American Revolution: Or, The Political Sermons of the ...

John Wingate Thornton - United States - 1860 - 537 pages
...said, " to add another circumstance in our colonies, which contributes no mean part towards the growth and effect of this untractable spirit, — I mean their education. In no country in the world, perhaps, is the law so general a study. The profession itself is numerous and powerful,...
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