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" When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty; because apprehensions may arise lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws, to execute them in a tyrannical... "
The Eloquence of the British Senate: Being a Selection of the Best Speeches ... - Page 346
by William Hazlitt - 1809
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Constitutional Legislation in the United States: Its Origin, and Application ...

John Ordronaux - Constitutional law - 1891 - 696 pages
...justly pronounced the very definition of tyranny. " There can be no liberty," says Montesquieu, " where the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or body of magistrates." This fundamental truth in the foundation of popular government was recognized...
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The History of Canada: Canada under British rule

William Kingsford - Canada - 1892
...not be afraid of another. When the power of making laws, and the power of executing them, are uniteii in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates,...no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise, lest ihe same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws, to execute them in a tyrannical manner.' "...
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The Federalist and Other Contemporary Papers on the Constitution of the ...

Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, James Madison - United States - 1894 - 945 pages
...department. The reasons on which Montesquieu grounds his maxim, are a further demonstration of his meaning. " When the Legislative and Executive powers are united in the same person or body," says he, " there can be no liberty, because apprehensions may arise lest the name monarch or...
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Cases on Constitutional Law: With Notes, Part 1

James Bradley Thayer - Constitutional law - 1894
...Montesquien was gnided, it may clearly he inferred that, in saying " There can be no liberty where the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or body of magistrates," or, "if the power of judging he not separated from the legislative and executive...
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Orations, Addresses and Club Essays

George A. Sanders - Speeches, addresses, etc., American - 1895 - 400 pages
...directly, in compliance with a somewhat popular clamor. Montesquieu says: "There can be no liberty where the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person or body of magistrates." The House of Representatives and the President could easily unite the legislative...
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Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Volume 26

Charles Dudley Warner - Literature - 1896
...another;" "When the power of making laws and the power of executing them are united in the same person, or the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty,...because apprehensions may arise lest the same monarch or magistrates should enact tyrannical laws and execute them in a tyrannical manner;" "The power of judging...
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Argument in Opposition to Henry A. Du Pont's Claim to the Office of United ...

James L. Wolcott - 1896 - 70 pages
...department. The reasons on which Montesquieu grounds his maxim are a further demonstration of his meaning. " When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person or body," says he, " there can be no liberty, because apprehensions may arise, lest the taine monarch...
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Individual Freedom: The Germ of National Progress and Permanence, an Address ...

Thomas Francis Bayard - Free enterprise - 1896 - 43 pages
...departments of power should be separate and distinct." "There can be no liberty," said Montesquieu, "where the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person or body of magistrates." 21 remarkable page in the history of civilized mankind. The echoes of the savage...
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Library of the World's Best Literature: A-Z

Charles Dudley Warner, Hamilton Wright Mabie, Lucia Isabella Gilbert Runkle, George H. Warner, Edward Cornelius Towne - Literature - 1897
...another;" "When the power of making laws and the power of 'executing them are united in the same person, or the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty,...because apprehensions may arise lest the same monarch or magistrates should enact tyrannical laws and execute them in a tyrannical manner;" "The power of judging...
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Lawyers' Reports Annotated, Book 40

Law reports, digests, etc - 1898
...three sorts of powers: The executive, the legislative, and the judicial. When the legislative and the executive powers are united in the same person, or...same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty. Again, there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive...
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