Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own: He who secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 142
1895
Full view - About this book

The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1993 - 1092 pages
...Men, "The Conlenied Man" 1 1 91 2]. 5 Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his s JOHN DRYDEN (1631-1 700), English poet, dramaiisl, critic. Imitation of Horace, bk. 3, ode 29 (1685)....
Limited preview - About this book

Robert Burns: The Critical Heritage

Donald A. Low - Reference - 1995 - 447 pages
...Or, in the spirited version of Dryden, Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day his own, He who, secure within, can say Tomorrow do thy worst, — for I have liv'd to-day. Sentiments akin to that which I have described, harmonizing so happily with the mixture...
Limited preview - About this book

The Third and Only Way: Reflections on Staying Alive

Helen Bevington - Biography & Autobiography - 1996 - 209 pages
...short views." Horace defined a happy man: Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call today his own: He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy...joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. So did Matthew Arnold (writing about Goethe): And he was happy, if to know Causes of things, and far...
Limited preview - About this book

The Idea of Decline in Western History

Arthur Herman - History - 1997 - 521 pages
...diem. Life was too short, and happiness too fleeting, to permit any postponement of gratification. Tomorrow, do thy worst, for I have lived today; Be...The joys I have possessed in spite of Fate are mine . . .6 But the Greco-Roman view of time also contained the conviction that events do not occur at random...
Limited preview - About this book

Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1997 - 625 pages
...pt. 1, "Morning" (1841). Pippa's song. 3 Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his own; He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow, do thy worst, for I have lived today. JOHN DRYDEN, (1631-1700) British poet, dramatist, critic. "Imitation of Horace," bk. 3, Ode 29 (1685)....
Limited preview - About this book

An Autobiography

David Ogilvy - Biography & Autobiography - 1997 - 208 pages
...and Dryden translated it into English: Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own: He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. 170 FAVORITE WORDS I am fascinated by this list of words. abcedary akimbo chiaroscuro diapason egregious...
Limited preview - About this book

The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...sky. 3070 (translation of Horace: Odes) Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his Among these dark Satanic mills? 1349 Milton {prefacel Bring me my bow of burning gol 3071 (translatlon of Juvenal: Satires) Look round the habitable world! how few Know their own good;...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1650-1740

University of Cambridge - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 334 pages
...selfmastery of the retired person: "Happy the Man, and happy he alone, / He, who can call to day his own: / He, who secure within, can say / Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have liv'd to day. / Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, / The joys I have possest, in spight of fate are...
Limited preview - About this book

Feng Shui for Success & Happiness

Richard Webster - House & Home - 1999 - 151 pages
...Fortunate and Unfortunate Directions Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call today his own; He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. — John Drydens translation of Horace We all have four positive and four negative directions, determined...
Limited preview - About this book

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Peter France - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 656 pages
...call to day his own: He, who secure within, can say To morrow do thy worst, for I have liv'd to day. Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, The joys I have possest, in spight of fate are mine. Not Heav'n it self upon the past has pow'r, But what has been,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF