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" Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own: He who secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 142
1895
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Familiar Quotations: Being an Attempt to Trace to Their Source Passages and ...

John Bartlett - Quotations - 1865 - 480 pages
...cart. Prologue to Lee's Sophonisbo. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. Imitation of Horace. Book i. Ode 29. Line 65. But Shadwell never deviates into sense. Mac Flech,oe....
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden: Containing Original Poems, Tales, and ...

John Dryden - 1867 - 445 pages
...winds, their scattcr'd honours mourn. Happy the man, and happy he alone, * He, who can call to-day his hich cannot be withstood, possess'd, in spiŁe of fate, are mine. " Not Heaven itself upon the past has power ; But what has...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 5; Volume 68

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1867
...it is that we have here a joy that nothing can take away : " Come foul, or fair, or rain, or shino, The joys I have possessed in spite of fate are mine ˇ Not Heaven itself upon the past has ролуег, But what h:is hc'cn has been, and 1 have lived my hour." A view so opposite to that of...
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A handbook of poetry. To which is added a new poetica anthology and a ...

Joseph Edwards Carpenter - 1868
...may slip away. TO-MORROW (continued). Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day his own ! He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. DKYDEN. The hoary fool, who many days Has struggled with continued sorrow, Renews his hopes, and blindly...
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Familiar Quotations: Being an Attempt to Trace to Their Source : Passages ...

John Bartlett - Quotations - 1868 - 778 pages
...&^ ""^ v He who can call to-day his own : V-& f»~" *«t" "?' -l"* ' " „ , ... -z*~r' o. >-<.<Ł. He who, secure within, can say, ' To-morrow, do thy worst, for I have liv'd to-day. Imitation of Horace. Book i. Ode 29. Line 65. Not heaven itself upon the past has power...
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A New Dictionary of Qoutations

1869
...enjoyed, the blessings of existence: — "Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day his own ; He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day." DRYDEN. The man who has lived for beneficent purposes, and has laid up a store of good actions, has...
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Treasury of Choice Quotations

Treasury - Quotations, English - 1869 - 458 pages
...cart. Prologue to Lee's Sophonisba. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. Imitation of Horace. Book i. Ode 29. Line 63. But Shadwell never deviates into sense. Mac Flechnoe....
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The Standard Fourth Reader: With Spelling and Defining Lessons, Exercises in ...

Epes Sargent - Readers and speakers - 1871 - 336 pages
...IMPROVE THE PRESENT MOMENT. — Dryden. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, TO-MORROW ! do thy worst, for I have lived TO-DAY 1 Be fair or foul, or rain 'or shine, The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate are mine. Not Heaven...
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A NEW CONVERSATION GRAMMAR OF THE GERMAN LANGUGAGE

AUGUSTUS BOLTZ - 1872
...hour And pnt it out of Fortune's pow'r: Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day his own, He who, secure within, can say: To-morrow do thy worst, for I have liv'd to-day. Be fair or foul, or rain or shine, The joys I have possess'd, in spite of fate, are mine....
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 8

Alexander Pope - Poets, English - 1872 - 10 pages
...in his company when alive ? Those half hours we have had, and as Dry den boldly says from Horace : Not Heaven itself upon the past has power ; But what has been, has been, aud I have had my hour. My head orders my heart to stop. auaded he will not dislike, to the benefit...
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