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" Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive that in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights... "
Proceedings of the ... Annual Meeting of the Indiana State Bar Association - Page 14
by Indiana State Bar Association (1916- ) - 1908
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The Political Thought of Justice Antonin Scalia: A Hamiltonian on the ...

James Brian Staab - Biography & Autobiography - 2006 - 369 pages
...between the Court's understanding of inherent judicial power and Hamilton's observation in Federalist 78: [T]he judiciary, from the nature of its functions,...least in a capacity to annoy or injure them. . . . The judiciary . . . has no influence over either the sword or the purse, no direction either of the strength...
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Crafting Constitutional Democracies: The Politics of Institutional Design

Edward V. Schneier - Law - 2006 - 273 pages
...rare. There is rather universal truth to Hamilton's observation that among the branches of government, "the judiciary, from the nature of its functions,...it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them."48 Disputes over the "proper" role of the courts are particularly likely to arise in democracies...
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Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future: A ...

John J. DiIulio - History - 2007 - 309 pages
...federal judges: Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive that, in a government in which they are separated from each...dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution. . . . [The judiciary] has no influence over either the sword or the purse. ... It may truly be said...
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David's Hammer: The Case for an Activist Judiciary

Clint Bolick - Law - 2007 - 188 pages
...fulfilling the aims of the Constitution. Hamilton viewed the judiciary as the branch of government "least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution;...will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them." Whereas the executive branch holds the power of war and the legislative branch holds the power of the...
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America's Survival Guide

Michael Warren - History - 2007 - 236 pages
...the Congress or President that violate the Constitution or the law. Although Hamilton predicted that "the judiciary, from the nature of its functions,...dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution," he also understood that judicial review was an indispensable power necessary to maintain the integrity...
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The Political Theory of a Compound Republic: Designing the American Experiment

Vincent Ostrom, Barbara Allen - Political Science - 2008 - 285 pages
...must be regarded by the judges, as a fundamental law. (Federalist 78, par. 11) In Hamilton's view, "[T]he judiciary, from the nature of its functions,...dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution. . . ." (Federalist 78, par. 6). The judiciary controls neither "the sword" nor "the putse" of the community;...
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