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out, and took visitors off my hands very much

, sai. &. To be súre, very fast people ; but perhaps they do Friars-bridge school turned up. Mr. Lowe trusteit; it sincerely

, and care for the poor all the while, only they that time.

do not fit their life to their work. I suppose in your day E. It was a famous opening for you, as not inter: they simply would not have done it. with Mrs. Lowe, and taking up such a wild place E. I doubt whether such people's work can carry much how readily your father came into building the nek's blessing with it. It is probably hurried through without

S. Who would have thought it? That did siw, much judgment. I do think tliat if young girls are to be march of opinion. Then you know he likes s allowed to go about alone in towns and villages

, there plans, and using all his own materials

. He is ver o ought to be a very staid and quiet demeanour to make it about cottages, and we have got a partnership nors discreet

, and a thoughtful
, unworldly spirit

, to make the ever there is any cottage in hand. He makes the who work prosper

. But it may be from having seen none but plan, and I do the elevations, and beautify a little 27 owd people lately that these things strike me. E. And you do it correctly?

S. I am sure you would see much to startle you if you S. Don't I ? The carpenter pays me such copp" looked closer--firting, that one should reprove in poor and I assure you my suggestions are often taken o girls

, and great independence ; for it by where doors and staircases should come, and I am it that the going about is allowed, or approved. They begging for bed-room fire-places and good windori think their mothers absurdly scrupulous and timid, and go

E. Well, you have carried out a great deal by d?" their own' way. and your

workhouse visiting and London schooling, E. And perhaps will not learn obedience till they have, S. Ali, there's an end of that'; but there are please been well frightened by some tramper, for there is often take it, and workhouse comes instead. And, to reason in the mother's caution. Now even our friends at Mr. Craven is a different person to work under frog: did not seem to me very consistent-those invisiLowe, and spirits one up; and Papa has it pretr> ble Sanday bonnets, and in the week such jaunty little his own way at the Board, so it is very plain sailing

hats and jackets, and the gowns all flounces. E. I cannot think how you do it all, for you !

8. It is their usual dress; and, after all, dress is somealways at hand in the morning.

thing like character, it will not do to put it off for the S. It is afternoon's work mostly, and Friars-brida

vonce; and perhaps my thick veil in London, through for a drive. Mamma likes it, and gets out to speak e

which nobody knew me, was like some of my hypocrișies. children. It is a primitive affair, quite in her war

* E. Certainly character tells on dress. Yours is always. winter I often drive her in the morning, and in the ss quiet. I do not mind your brown hat at all. noon, while I go my ways, she can have Ellen. 5. Becally those are very good girls, honest and trans

E. You see more of girls than I do. Does not is parent, only uncontrolled, and in high spirits. Well, I you that many undertake works of charity

must go and see what the world is about, and whether the unsuited to them, light-minded people with smart and off-hand manners, who look on a good work as 1>

are come. I suppose by the time I am & of compensation to the rest of their life ?

poor people

spinster you will have settled what to do, and I can help

you.

E. Or all will have been ordered for us quite differently from wbat we expect. So why forecast ?

Leave it all in His high hand,
Who doth hearts as streams command.'

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A FEW JOTTINGS FROM PARISH REGISTERS. Those who profess to criticise historians in these days, often tell us that the true history of a nation does not consist in the actions of a few great men, or in the narra-an tive of a few great events ; but in the gradual uprise of customs, habits, and modes of thoughts, of which great men are but the representatives, and great events the natural consequences. We are told also that historians would do well to separate themselves from the more open paths of history, and to seek amidst the bye-paths of life, for the rise and progress of those currents of popular feeling, which, springing up often most imperceptibly

, gradually swell into powerful torrents of opinion. Whether this axiom be true or not, we may, at all events, be assured, that many interesting illustrations of public feeling may be derived from a study of local traditions and local customs. The late Bishop - Stanley was fully alive to this fact, and in a curious pamphlet entitled,

Questions to the Clergy,' endeavoured to point out the vast amount of archæological, historical, and scientific information, which might soon be obtained, if each clergyman would carefully note down and record in some public work, the information he could gather on any of these points, in connection with his own parish. Happening to mention this idea of the bishop's to some valued friends of ours in the ancient town of Coventry, one of them im. mediately informed us of the excellent state of the parish registers, kept in the parish church of St. Michael's in that town ; telling us at the same time, that from the curious entries they contained, we might easily collect

6

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E. Or all will have been ordered for us quite difere much useful and entertaining information upon many from what we expect. So why forecast ?

subjects of historical importance, and also upon the

growth or decline of many uses and abuses more direct• Leave it all in His high hand,

ly connected with the church. Catching at the sug. Who doth hearts as streams command.'

gestion

, we craved permission to examine these said registers

, a permission readily granted to us by the kind A FEW JOTTINGS FROM PARISH REGISTE courtesy of the churchwardens of the parish. 'We found Those #ho profess to criticise historians in these or that the books were for the most part beautifully kept

, often tell us that the true history of a nation de re and that all the earlier manuscripts were written in old consist in the actions of a few great men

, or in the his English. Some of them had very curiously illuminated tive of a few great events ; but in the gradual upis capital letters at the commencement of each important customs, habits , and modes of thoughts, of which are entry

. But here it should be mentioned, that St. Michael's

is the eburch of the original parish of Corentry, and that men are but the representatives, and great events natural consequences. We are told also that historia

Coventry was in earlier days the capital of the Midland

counties, and an episcopal see. Frequent mention is would do well to separate themselves from the more con , and to seek amidst the bye

made of this city in English history, and Shakspeare inof

troduces it as the scene of two or three important events for the rise and progress of those currents of peord

imperceptet
plays

referred to herenfter. gradually swell into powerful torrents of opier

In opening, then, the parish registers, we find that the Whether this axiom be true or not, we may, at all even be assured, that many interesting illustrations of poli

entry dated from the year A, D. 1564, or the sixth feeling may be derived from a study of local trador ser of Queen Elizabeth's reign. At that early period and local customs. The late Bishop Stanley was ist

We find mention made of pews, which were gradually alive to this fact, and in a curious pamphlet entis Questions to the Clergy,' endeavoured to point out i

of the restry' and churchwardens, and were, let by them

Michael's Church the pews were entirely in the bands vast amount of archæological, historical, and scientide 1 formation, which might soon be obtained, if each der

1 term of years; some were allotted to certain persons man would carefully note down and record in some po

for a life, or lives. Yet that the whole area was not colic work, the information he could gather on any points, in connection with his own parish. Hlapper

church

first

stealing into and disfiguring

our churches. . In St.

till a later date, we gather from the frequent entries of

tered with these enormities against taste and convenience to mention this idea of the bishop's to some valued frien of ours in the ancient town of Coventry,

licenses for the erection of pews, and also of fines exacted

from those who exceeded their allotted space. Thus,. mediately informed us of the excellent state of the pas registers, kept in the parish church of St. Michaelis i pews increased, and a large portion of the annual income that town; telling us at the same time, that from of the parish was, in the earlier days of Charles the First, curious entries they contained, we might easily cuk

derived from the rents of pews. In 1635 the whole

of the

one of them in

income of the parish from rents, grares, and the like, . amounted to £94 1s. 6d., and of this, £34 Is. Id. was received from pew.rents. In every year's accounts we find entries of moneys received for the mayor and fellow. ship pews, for pews in the great gallery, the north gallery, &c. In 1672 £l was the highest amount charged for the annual rent of a pew, and the lowest sum demanded for a sitting was 4d. That most of these pews were erected at the expense of private individuals, and that, too, occasionally, without the consent of the vestry, wę gather from such entries as the following :-On April 2nd, 1717, the vestry ordered that five persons named, be reimbursed the charge they have been at in building a new. seat adjoining to Mr. Ash, his seat, without the consent of the parish, and that the said new erected seat be förthiwith set for the best advantage of the parish.' July 29th, 1741, has the following curious entry : ‘that the place of Mr. Thomas Chapman, and of Mary, his wife, in the little cross gallery, be made into one eminent pew for their use.'. “ But be it always provided that the present incumbent's widow, and the respective widows of all his successors for ever, shall hold and enjoy the first place next the pillar, free from the payment of any rent of the same.' Earlier than this, in the year 1621, a general vestry ordered that the seat 'Sir W. Tate, Knight took in the · long gallery, shall belong to Whitley House, till Mr. Zouch Tate, heir of the same house, come to the age of twenty-one years ; he to have the refusing of it, providing always there be paid to the church yearly the sum of five shillings.'

Pews, however, being notorious breeders of quarrels, we find continual proofs that the vestry and churchwardens were beset with difficulties in their management of them. Thus, the corporation often resisted the claims · for rents, and private individuals would not pay their arrears. At a vestry, held August 5th, 1734, we find it

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income of the parish from rents, grares, and the ordered that ' Richard Broekhurst doe state the case to amounted to £94 1s. 6d., and of this, £34 1. laxi Mr. Skort, procfor in Lichfield, for his advice how to proreceived from pew, rents. In every year's accouze ceed against such persons, refusing to pay their pew rents." firid entries of moneys received for the mayor and is The question was put, and on August 9th, 1734, Mr. ship pews, for pews in the great gallery, the north face Short answers, that “as seát rents without doubt are of &c. In 1672 £1 was the highest amount chargeecelesiastical cognizance, an action, without doubt, will the annual rent of a pew; and the lowest sum deras lie in our court for recovering of arrears.' After this for a sitting was 4d. That most of these pers a curious bit of law the proctor states

, that the churchwarerected at the expense of private individuals

, and a dens could take possession of the pews of persons refusing ton, occasionally, without the consent of the vesty a to pay ; and then ends with this strange recommendation, gather from such entries as the following:-On Aprli that as the restry will be most likely met in the ecele1717, the restry ordered that fire persons named, "we siastical courts • by many quirps,' and perhaps even by a imbursed the charge they have been at in building se prohibition, they have best move first by a bill in exseat adjoining to Mr. Ash

, his seat, without the couchequer." In accordance with this opinion, we find that of the parish, and that the said new erected seat be šias one Mr. Evans was ordered to be presented for arrears-of with set for the best advantage of the parish' Jul a ment, and that also (31st of July, 1735,) Mr. White, 1741, has the following curious entry : 'that the pa slicitor.) doe demand of the corporation all moneys due Mr. Thomas Chapman, and of Mary, his wife

, i to ulijs parish church, and in default of payment, doe sue little cross gallery, be made into one eminent use.” . “But be it always provided that the present inte

Defalcations of rent were not, however, the only diffibent's widow, and the respective widows of all his

culties to be overcome. On October 9th, 1751, the proc-. sors for ever, shall hold and enjoy the first place

tor at Lichfield is consulted as to whether the mayor pillar, free from the payment of any rent of the and corporation had any right to put locks on the doors Earlier than this, in the year 1621, a general

as by so doing they excluded the ordered that the seat 'Sir W. Tate, Knight took it " wear, churchwardens, and vestry, from having long gallery, shall belong to Whitley House, till. passage to and from the south leads of this parish church.'

It is asked at the same time, whether any person Zouch Tate, heir of the same house, come to the 2**

has a twenty-one years ; he to have the refusing of it, prosta to put a lock on the door of his pew,' for, say always there be paid to the church yearly the sum of

the sestry, 'if this practice should wholly prevail, shillings.' Pews, however, being notorious breeders of quam

munions, and admission of strangers into proper seats, we find continual proofs that the restry and chan would be impracticable, and Divine worship deprived of . wardens were beset with difficulties in their manage

the conveniency, decency, and order which the public offices of them. Thus, the corporation often resisted the class

of our Church require.' We did not find any answer to · for rents, and private individuals would not par !

this noble protest ; but in November 25, 1751, certain arrears

. At a vestry, held August 5th, 1784, ne persons were ordered to be presented to the ecolesiastical

for the same.

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