Report of the State Geologist on the Mineral Industries and Geology of Vermont, Volume 6

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Page 204 - Barrande, from Sir William Logan in September, a few days before setting out for my field duties in Wisconsin. Since my return to Albany, constant and pressing occupation has left me no time to consider a reply to a question of so much importance. Later discoveries in the limestones associated with the shales at Quebec leave no longer a doubt, if any could have been entertained before, that the shales of Georgia, Vermont, are in the same relative position ; and we must regard these three trilobites...
Page 83 - ... of the position, age and lithological character of the rock formations, they have at the same time very unexpectedly disclosed organic remains, which are of much scientific interest and importance. In grading the line of the Rutland and Burlington Railroad, portions of the skeletons of two large animals, both belonging to the class mammalia, and to families which no longer exist here in a living state, were found deeply buried in the earth, and the bones were for the most part in a very good...
Page 60 - Hardwick," is a quartz monzonite of dark-gray shade, a little darker than "dark Barre" and a trifle lighter than "dark Quincy." Its texture is medium, with feldspars up to 0.3 inch and mica to 0.2 inch, generally even grained but with sparse, clear, porphyritic feldspars up to 0.4 inch, inclosing the feldspars, quartz, and mica. Its constituents, in descending order of abundance, are smoky quartz with hairlike crystals of rutile, with cavities in sheets parallel to rift cracks and
Page 36 - Muscovite apparently occurs in two forms, one corresponding to the biotite, as seemingly primary, and the other in small flakes in the orthoclase, and clearly a secondary mineral. Accessory constituents are oligoclase, albite (?), titanite (sphene), and apatite. There is an almost total absence of magnetite or other iron ore. Biotite is slightly changed to green, and probably yields chlorite in some...
Page 55 - ... north extension of Main street. It has a south face of 525 feet and has been worked about 200 feet to the north. The stone is typical limestone of this area, being coarsely crystalline and having a slightly bluish light gray color. It contains suture joints from two to fifteen inches apart and varying in size from a fraction of an inch to three inches in depth. The following is a der scription of the stone by channel cuts from the top to the bottom of the quarry. 8-5 ft. Red clay and chert stripping.
Page 71 - ... detected. The secondary minerals are kaolin, a white mica, epidote, zoisite in some abundance, and very little calcite. The stone does not effervesce with cold dilute muriatic acid. WT Schaller, chemist, of the United States Geological Survey, finds that it contains 0.07 per cent of CaO (lime) soluble in dilute (10 per cent) acetic acid, which indicates a content of 0.125 per cent of CaCO (lime carbonate) , which is very slight. A chemical analysis made for the EB Ellis Granite Company by Charles...
Page 205 - To sum up in a few words — all the evidence, paleontological and stratigraphical, as yet brought forward, affords no proof of the existence in Vermont of any strata (a small spur of Laurentian excepted) lower than the Potsdam formation, which the present advocates of the Taconic system regard as forming its summit.
Page 206 - Chazy-Trenton, and perhaps at its base by an Upper Cambrian fauna ; and the original Lower Taconic slate of Emmons is correlated, by its stratigraphic position, with the Hudson shales.2 In 1888, Walcott, in studying a section of these rocks in Newfoundland, placed, from paleontological evidences, the "Red Sandrock" series, the Georgia shale and slate series, the "Granular Quartz...
Page 62 - ... same calculation are : Feldspars (adding 20 per cent to the number as an estimate of the uncounted soda-lime particles), 0.162 inch; quartz, 0.106 inch; mica, 0.0406 inch. Average diameter of all particles, 0.123 inch. The rock effervesce islightly with cold dilute muriatic acid. WT Schaller, chemist, of the United States Geological Survey, finds that it contains 0.23 per cent of CaO (lime) soluble in warm dilute acetic acid (10 per cent), which indicates a content of 0.4 per cent of CaCO, (lime...
Page 63 - The Roy quarry is in the town of Oxford, three-fourth mile from Oxford village. Operator, Elie Roy ; office, 94 Chestnut street, Lewiston, Me. The granite (specimen 121, a) is a muscovite-biotite granite of medium cream-gray color and of medium (inclining to coarse) evengrained texture, with feldspars up to four-tenths inch in diameter. It consists, in approximate descending order of abundance, of a cream-colored potash feldspar (orthoclase and microcline), smoky quartz, cream-colored soda-lime feldspar...

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