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think I would have gone ? You can do what you like with me—but not that, not that!"

Heyst looked into the dim aisles of the forest. Everything was so still now that the very ground on which they stood seemed to exhale silence into the shade.

"Why be indignant?" he remonstrated. “It has not happened. I gave up pleading with Wang. Here we are, repulsed! Not only without power to resist the evil, but unable to make terms for ourselves with the worthy envoys, the envoys extraordinary of the world we thought we had done with for years and years. And that's bad, Lena, very bad.”

"It's funny,” she said thoughtfully. "Bad ? 1 suppose it is. I don't know that it is. But do you ? Do you? You talk as if you didn't believe in it."

She gazed at him earnestly.

“Do I? Ah! That's it. I don't know how to talk. I have managed to refine everything away. I've said to the Earth that bore me: 'I am I and you are a shadow. And, by Jove, it is so! But it appears that such words cannot be uttered with impunity. Here I am a Shadow inhabited by Shades! How is one to intimidate, persuade, resist, assert oneself against them? I have lost all belief in realities. ... Lena, give me your hand.”

She looked at him surprised, uncomprehending.

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"Your hand,” he cried.

She obeyed; he seized it with avidity as if eager to raise it to his lips, but half-way up released his grasp. They looked at each other for a time.

"What's the matter, dear ?" she whispered timidly.

“Neither force nor conviction,” Heyst muttered wearily to himself. “How am I to meet this charmingly simple problem ?”

"I am sorry,” she murmured.

“And so am I,” he confessed quickly. “And the bitterest of this humiliation is its complete uselessness —which I feel, I feel!”

She had never before seen him give such signs of feeling. Across his ghastly face the long moustaches flamed in the shade. He spoke suddenly:

"I wonder if I could find enough courage to creep among them in the night, with a knife, and cut their throats one after another, as they slept! I wonder-"

She was frightened by his unwonted appearance more than by the words in his mouth, and said earnestly:

"Don't you try to do such a thing! Don't you think of it!"

“I don't possess anything bigger than a penknife. As to thinking of it, Lena, there's no saving what one

may think of.

I don't think. Something in me thinks—something foreign to my nature. What is the matter?"

He noticed her parted lips, and the peculiar stare in her eyes, which had wandered from his face.

“There's somebody after us. I saw something white moving,” she cried.

Heyst did not turn his head; he only glanced at her outstretched arm.

“No doubt we are followed; we are watched.”
"I don't see anything now," she said.

\"And it does not matter,” Heyst went on in his ordinary voice. “Here we are in the forest. I have neither strength nor persuasion. Indeed, it's extremely difficult to be eloquent before a Chinaman's head stuck at one out of a lot of brushwood. But can we wander among these big trees indefinitely ? Is this a refuge ? No! What else is left to us? I did think for a moment of the mine; but even there we could not remain very long. And then that gallery is not safe. The props were too weak to begin with.

Ants have been at work there-ants after the men. A death-trap, at best. One can die but once, but there are many manners of death.”

The girl glanced about fearfully, in search of the watcher or follower whom she had glimpsed once among the trees; but if he existed, he had concealed

himself. Nothing met her eyes but the deepening shadows of the short vistas between the living columns of the still roof of leaves. She looked at the man besides her expectantly, tenderly, with suppressed affright and a sort of awed wonder.

“I have also thought of these people's boat," Heyst went on. “We could get into that, and—only they have taken everything out of her. I have seen her oars and mast in a corner of their room. Το shove off in an empty boat would be nothing but a desperate expedient, supposing even that she would drift out a good distance between the islands before the morning It would only be a complicated manner of committing suicide—to be found dead in a boat, dead from sun and thirst. A sea mystery. I wonder who would find us! Davidson, perhaps; but Davidson passed westward ten days ago.

I watched him steaming past one early morning, from the jetty.”

"You never told me," she said.

“He must have been looking at me through his big binoculars. Perhaps, if I had raised my armbut what did we want with Davidson then, you and I ? He won't be back this way for three weeks. I wish I had raised my arm that morning."

“What would have been the good of it ?" she sighed out.

“What good ? No good, of course.

We had no forebodings. This seemed to be an inexpugnable refuge, where we could live untroubled and learn to know each other.”

“It's perhaps in trouble that people get to know each other,” she suggested.

"Perhaps," he said indifferently. "At any rate, we would not have gone away from here with him; though I believe he would have come in eagerly enough, and ready for any service he could render. It's that fat man's nature—a delightful fellow. You would not come on the wharf that time I sent the shawl back to Mrs. Schomberg through him. has never seen you."

“I didn't know that you wanted anybody ever to see me,” she said.

He had folded his arms on his breast and hung his head.

“And I did not know that you cared to be seen as yet. A misunderstanding evidently. An honourable misunderstanding. But it does not matter now."

He raised his head after a silence.

"How gloomy this forest has grown! Yet surely the sun cannot have set already.

She looked round; and as if her eyes had just been opened, she perceived the shades of the forest surrounding her, not so much with gloom, but with

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