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California.

Constitution for legislature elected under the same, which is hereby authorized to

negotiate for such amount as may be necessary to pay the expenses
of the state government.

R. SEMPLE,
President of the Convention, and Delegate from Benicia.
WM. G. MARCY, Secretary.

J. ARAM, C. T. BOTTS, E. Brown, J. A. CARRILLO, J. M. COVARRUBIAS, E. O. CROSBY, P. DE LA GUERRA, L. DENT, M. DOMINGUEZ, K. H. DIMMICK, A. J. Ellis, S. C. FOSTER, E. GILBERT, (1) W. M. Gwin, H. W. HALLECK, JULIAN HANKS, L. W. HASTINGS, HENRY HILL, J. Hobson, J. McH. HOLLINSWORTH, J. M. JONES, (2) J. D. HOPPE, (3) T. 0. LARKIN, Francis J. LIPPITT,

B. S. LIPPINCOTT, M. M. McCARVER, Join McDougal, B. F. MOORE, MYRON NORTON, P. ORD, MIGUEL PEDRORENA, A. M. Pico, R. M. PRICE, Hugo REID, Jacinto RODRIGUEZ, PEDRO SANSEVAINE, W. E. SHANNON, W. S. SHERWOOD, J. R. SNYDER, A. STEARNS, W. M. STEUART J. A. SUTTER, HENRY A. TEFFT, (4) S. L. VERMEULE, M. G. VALLEJO, J. WALKER, 0. M. WOZENCRAFT.

(1) Was killed in a duel at Oak Cottage, near Sacramento City, on the morning of 2d of August, 1852. Was editor of "Alta California."

(2) Died of consumption at San José, in December, 1851. Was Judge of U. S. District Court

(3) Died April 17th, 1853, at San José, from injuries received by the explosion of steamer Jenny Lind.

(4) Was drowned at Santa Barbara, in January, 1852. Was Judge of Second Judicial District.

LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES RELATIVE

TO NATURALIZATION.

tions.

three years be

CHAPTER XXVIII.
AN ACT to establish a uniform rule of Naturalization, and to repeal

the acts heretofore passed on that subject.-[Approved, April 14,

1802.] Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Uni

ted States of America in Congress assembled :

SECTION 1. That any alien, being a free white person, may be ad. An alien may be mitted to become a citizen of the United States, or any of them, on the United States. the following conditions, and not otherwise :

1. That he shall have declared on oath or affirmation, before the Tot declaration Supreme, Superior, District, or Circuit Court, of some one of the tion, in the su:

preme or superior states, or of the territorial districts of the United States, or a Circuit, court, or district or District Court of the United States, three years at least before his of some of the admission, that it was bona fide his intention to become a citizen of United States, the United States, and to renounce for ever all allegiance and fidelity fore his adveieso to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty whatever, and to renounce for particularly by name, the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, ance to any soverwhereof such alien may at the time be a citizen or subject. [Repealed.] which he is a sub

2. That he shall, at the time of his application to be admitted, de- To swear or af clare, on oath or affirmation, before some one of the courts aforesaid, support the conthat he will support the constitution of the United States, and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty whatever, and particularly by name the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty whereof he was before a citizen or subject, which proceeding shall be recorded by the clerk of the court.

3. That the court admitting such alien shall be satisfied that he That he shall has resided within the United States five years at least, and within the the United States state or territory where such court is at the time held one year at he shall be admitleast ; and it shall further appear to their satisfaction that during Shall prove that that time he has behaved as a man of a good moral character, at- good moral chartached to the principles of the constitution of the United States, and the constitution

eign or state of

stitution of the United States.

have resided in

of the United States.

That he shall renounce every

held by him.

tached to the constitution of

On what conditions an alien may be naturalized who resided in the United States after the

1795.

well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same : Provided, that the oath of the applicant shall in no case be allowed to prove his residence.

4. That in case the alien applying to be admitted to citizenship title of nobility shall have borne any hereditary title, or been of any of the orders of

nobility in the kingdom or state from which he came, he shall, in adShall prove that dition to the above requisites, make an express renunciation of his title good moral char- or order of nobility in the court to which his application shall be acter, and at

made, which renunciation shall be made and recorded in the said the United States. Court: Provided, that no alien who shall be a native citizen, denizen,

or subject of any country, state, or sovereign with whom the United States shall be at war at the time of his application, shall be then ad

mitted to be a citizen of the United States : Provided, also, that any 29th of January, alien who was residing within the limits and under the jurisdiction of

the United States, before the twenty-ninth day of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, may be admitted to become a citizen on due proof made, to some one of the courts aforesaid, that he has resided two years at least within and under the jurisdiction of the United States, and one year at least immediately preceding his appli

cation within the state or territory where such court is at the time Proceedings to

held, and on his declaring on oath, or affirmation, that he will supthe clerk of the port the constitution of the United States, and that he doth absolute

ly and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty whatever, and particularly by name the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty whereof he was before a citizen or subject; and moreover on its appearing to the satisfaction of the court that during the said term of two years he has behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same; and where the alien applying for admission to citizenship shall have borne any hereditary title, or been of any of the orders of nobility in the kingdom or state from which he

came; on his moreover making in the court an express renunciation Provision in favor of persons of his title or order of nobility before he shall be entitled to such adresiding in the

mission; all of which proceedings, required in this proviso to be perJanuary, 1795, formed in the court, shall be recorded by the clerk thereof; and proJune, 1798. ided also that any alien who was residing within the limits and un

der the jurisdiction of the United States at any time between the said twenty-ninth day of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninetyfive, and the eighteenth day of June, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight, may within two years after the passing of this act be

be recorded by

court.

United States between the 29th

and the 18th

ization pre

Free white per

admitted to become a citizen without a compliance with the first condition above specified.

Sec. 2. Provided, also, and be it further enacted, That, in ad- Mode of natural dition to the directions aforesaid, all free white persons being aliens scribed. who

may arrive in the United States after the passing of this act, sons arriving in shall, in order to become citizens of the United States, make registry States to be and obtain certificates in the following manner, to wit: every person

registered desirous of being naturalized shall, if of the age of twenty-one years, make report of himself, or if under the age of twenty-one years, or held in service, shall be reported by his parent, guardian, master, or mistress, to the clerk of the district court of the district where such alien or aliens shall arrive, or to some other court of record of the United States, or of either of the territorial districts of the same, or of a particular state; and such report shall ascertain the name, birth- Form of register. place, age, nation, and allegiance of each alien, together with the country whence he or she migrated, and the place of his or her intended settlement; and it shall be the duty of such clerk on receiving such report to record the same in his office, and to grant to the person making such report, and to each individual concerned therein, whenever he shall be required, a certificate under his hand and seal of office of such report and registry; and for receiving and registering each report of an individual or family he shall receive fifty cents, and for each certificate granted pursuant to this act to an individual or family fifty cents; and such certificate shall be exhibited to the court by every alien who may arrive in the United States, after the passing of this act, on his application to be naturalized, as evidence of his arrival within the United States. Sec. 3. And whereas doubts have arisen whether certain courts of What courts are

to be considered record in some of the states are included within the description of as capable of

naturalizing district or circuit courts : Be it further enacted, that every court of aliens. record in any individual state having common law jurisdiction, and a seal and clerk or prothonotary, shall be considered as a district court within the meaning of this act; and every alien who may have been naturalized in any such court shall enjoy, from and after the passing of the act, the same rights and privileges as if he had been naturalized in a district or circuit court of the United States.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the children of persons Children of per duly naturalized under any of the laws of the United States, or who, under certain previous to the passing of any law on that subject by the government citizens of the of the United States, may have become citizens of any one of the said states under the laws thereof, being under the age of twenty-one years,

United States.

extend to children of persons

resided in the

Privilege of citi- at the time of their parents being so naturalized or admitted to the

rights of citizenship, shall, if dwelling in the United States, be conwho have never sidered as citizens of the United States; and the children of

persons United States, etc who now are or have been citizens of the United States, shall, though

born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, be considered as citizens of the United States : Provided that the right of citizenship shall not descend to persons whose fathers have never resided within the United States: Provided, also, that no person heretofore proscribed by any state, or who has been legally convicted of having joined the army of Great Britain during the late war, shall be admitted a citizen as aforesaid without the consent of the legisla

ture of the state in which such person was proscribed. Repeal of former Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That all acts heretofore passed

respecting naturalization be and the same are hereby repealed.

acts.

CHAPTER XLVII.

AN ACT in addition to an act entitled An act to establish a uni

form rule of Naturalization, and to repeal the Acts heretofore passed on that subject."-[Approved, March 26, 1804.]

Certain aliens

1802.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the

United States of America in Congress assembled :

Section 1. That any alien, being a free white person, who was become citizens residing within the limits and under the jurisdiction of the United States who resid- States at any time between the eighteenth day of June, one thousand between the 18th seven hundred and ninety-eight, and the fourteenth day of April, one and 14th April, thousand eight hundred and two, and who has continued to reside

within the same, may be admitted to become a citizen of the United States without a compliance with the first condition specified in the first section of the act entitled “ An act to establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and to repeal the acts heretofore passed on that subject.”

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That when any alien who shall plied with certain have complied with the first condition specified in the first section of widow and chil- the said original act, and who shall have pursued the directions predren made citi

scribed in the second section of the said act, may die, before he is actually naturalized, the widow and the children of such alien shall be considered as citizens of the United States, and shall be entitled to all rights and privileges as such upon taking the oaths prescribed by law.

After an alien shall have com

zens of the United States.

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