Lives of Lord Lyndhurst and Lord Brougham: Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1869 - Judges - 596 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 167 - Satan except, none higher sat, with grave Aspect he rose, and in his rising seemed A pillar of state; deep on his front engraven Deliberation sat and public care; And princely counsel in his face yet shone, Majestic though in ruin: sage he stood, With Atlantean shoulders fit to bear The weight of mightiest monarchies; his look Drew audience and attention still as night Or summer's noontide air...
Page 329 - The Court of King's Bench having granted a rule to show cause why a criminal information should not be filed against Mr.
Page 596 - BERTHA'S Journal during a Visit to her Uncle in England. Containing a Variety of Interesting and Instructive Information. Seventh Edition. Woodcuts.
Page 357 - But how much nobler will be the Sovereign's boast, when he shall have it to say that he found law dear, and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book — left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich — left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression — left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence...
Page 123 - ... of the court, and situations in the household held by members of Parliament, should be included in the political arrangements made in a change of the administration ; but they are not of opinion that a similar principle should be applied or extended to the offices held by ladies in her majesty's household.
Page 113 - Bacchus' blessings are a treasure, Drinking is the soldier's pleasure: Rich the treasure, Sweet the pleasure, Sweet is pleasure after pain. Soothed with the sound, the king grew vain; Fought all his battles o'er again, And thrice he routed all his foes, and thrice he slew the slain!
Page 199 - For some unaccountable reason, Lyndhurst violently opposed this measure, and on the second reading he delivered a most elaborate, witty, unfair, and, I must add, profligate speech against the bill, and moved that it be read a second time that day three months.
Page 250 - The time is coming when perhaps a few old men, the last survivors of our generation, will in vain seek, amidst new streets, and squares, and railway stations, for the site of that dwelling...

Bibliographic information