The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: With An Essay on His Life and Genius, Volume 12

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Luke Hensard & Sons, 1810

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Page 423 - At night they set fire to the Fleet, and to the King's Bench, and I know not how many other places ; and one might see the glare of conflagration fill the sky from many parts. The sight was dreadful. Some people were threatened : Mr. Strahan advised me to take care of myself. — Such a time of terrour you have been happy in not seeing.
Page 276 - The reciprocal civility. of authors is one of the most risible scenes in the farce of life.
Page 332 - I cannot forbear to mention, that neither reason nor revelation denies you to hope, that you may increase her happiness by obeying her precepts ; and that she may, in her present state, look with pleasure upon every act of virtue to which her instructions or example have contributed.
Page 368 - The return of my birth-day, if I remember it, fills me with thoughts which it seems to be the general care of humanity to escape.
Page 181 - That the strength of his understanding, the accuracy of his discernment, and the ardour of his Curiosity, might have been remarked from his infancy, by a diligent observer, there is no reason to doubt. For, there is no instance of any man, whose history has been minutely related, that did not in every part of life discover the same proportion of intellectual vigour.
Page 39 - So far was this man from being made impious by philosophy, or vain by knowledge or by virtue, that he ascribed all his abilities to the bounty, and all his goodness to the grace of God. May his example extend its influence to his admirers and followers' May those who study his writings imitate his life ! and those who endeavour after his knowledge aspire likewise to his piety...
Page 438 - When Queen Mary took the resolution of sheltering herself in England, the Archbishop of St. Andrew's, attempting to dissuade her, attended on her journey; and when they came to the irremeable...
Page 445 - ALMIGHTY God, merciful Father, in whose hands are life and death, sanctify unto me the sorrow which I now feel. Forgive me whatever I have done unkindly to my mother, and whatever I have omitted to do kindly. Make me to remember her good precepts and good example, and to reform my life according to thy holy word, that I may lose no more opportunities of good.
Page 283 - It is the heaviest stone that melancholy can throw at a man, to tell him he is at the end of his nature ; or that there is no further state to come, unto which this seems progrcssional, and otherwise made in vain...
Page 276 - There are many things delivered rhetorically, many expressions therein merely tropical, and as they best illustrate my intention ; and therefore also there are many things to be taken in a soft and flexible sense, and not to be called unto the rigid test of reason.

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