How to Dazzle at Scientific Enquiry

Front Cover
Brilliant Publications

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
8
IV
9
V
10
VI
11
VII
12
VIII
13
IX
14
X
15
XXIII
28
XXIV
29
XXV
31
XXVI
32
XXVII
33
XXVIII
34
XXIX
35
XXX
36

XI
16
XII
17
XIII
18
XIV
19
XV
20
XVI
21
XVII
22
XVIII
23
XIX
24
XX
25
XXI
26
XXII
27
XXXI
37
XXXII
38
XXXIII
39
XXXIV
40
XXXV
41
XXXVI
42
XXXVII
44
XXXVIII
45
XXXIX
46
XL
47
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - Lavoisier's work on burning at key stage 3. When they try to answer a scientific question, they identify an appropriate approach. They select from a range of sources of information. When the investigation involves a fair test, they identify key factors to be considered. Where appropriate, they make predictions based on their scientific knowledge and understanding. They select apparatus for a range of tasks and plan to use it effectively. They make a series of observations, comparisons or measurements...
Page 6 - In their own investigative work, they decide on an appropriate approach [for example, using a fair test] to answer a question. Where appropriate, they describe, or show in the way they perform their task, how to vary one factor while keeping others the same. Where appropriate, they make predictions. They select information from sources provided for them.
Page 6 - Where appropriate, they make predictions. They select information from sources provided for them. They select suitable equipment and make a series of observations and measurements that are adequate for the task. They record their observations, comparisons and measurements using tables and bar charts. They begin to plot points to form simple graphs, and use these graphs to point out and interpret patterns in their data. They begin to relate their conclusions to these patterns and to scientific knowledge...
Page 6 - They make relevant observations and measure quantities, such as length or mass, using a range of simple equipment. Where appropriate, they carry out a fair test with some help, recognising and explaining why it is fair. They record their observations in a variety of ways. They provide explanations for observations and for simple patterns in recorded measurements. They communicate in a scientific way what they have found out and suggest improvements in their work.
Page 5 - Lavoisier's work on burning, the possible causes of global warming]; b) that it is important to test explanations by using them to make predictions and by seeing if evidence matches the predictions; c) about the ways in which scientists work today and how they worked in the past, including the roles of experimentation, evidence and creative thought in the development of scientific ideas.
Page 3 - A, B, C, D, E, F, G, KI, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, 0, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i...
Page 6 - Considering evidence j) use diagrams, tables, charts and graphs, including lines of best fit, to identify and describe patterns or relationships in data; k) use observations, measurements and other data to draw conclusions; I) decide to what extent these conclusions support a prediction or enable further predictions to be made...
Page 6 - They recognise why it is important to collect data to answer questions. They use simple texts to find information. They make relevant observations and measure quantities, such as length or mass, using a range of simple equipment. Where appropriate, they carry out a fair test with some help, recognising...
Page 5 - ... Planning a use scientific knowledge and understanding to turn ideas into a form that can be investigated, and to decide on an appropriate approach; b decide whether to use evidence from first-hand experience or secondary sources; c carry out preliminary work and to make predictions, where appropriate; d consider key factors that need to be taken into account when collecting evidence, and how evidence may be collected in contexts (for example, fieldwork...
Page 5 - ICT for datalogging (for example, variables changing over time] to an appropriate degree of precision; h) make sufficient relevant observations and measurements to reduce error and obtain reliable evidence...

Bibliographic information