Legal Services Program of the Office of Economic Opportunity: Hearing[s] Ninety-first Congress, First [and Second] Session[s] ...

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Page 9 - EC 1-1 A basic tenet of the professional responsibility of lawyers is that every person in our society should have ready access to the independent professional services of a lawyer of integrity and competence.
Page 8 - The sluggishness of many institutions — at all levels of society — in responding to the needs of individual citizens is one of the central problems of our time. Disadvantaged persons in particular must be assisted so that they fully understand the lawful means of making their needs known and having those needs met. This goal will be better served by a separate legal services program, one which can test new approaches to this important challenge.
Page 88 - February 8, 1951 and by the Board of Governors and the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association...
Page 40 - The principles are stated in the Declaration of Independence: first, that the purpose of democratic government is to secure the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for all citizens; second, that the powers of government are derived from the consent of the governed.
Page 4 - Congress, the American Bar Association, the National Legal Aid and Defender Association...
Page 50 - ... through experimentation. The function could be vested in a criminal justice assistant to the mayor or county executive, with staff relationships to executive agencies, and liaison with the courts, the bar and the community.
Page 12 - Through the adversary process which is at the heart of our judicial system, litigants are afforded a meaningful opportunity to influence events which affect them and their community. However, effective utilization of the courts requires legal assistance, a resource seldom available to the poor. Litigation is not the only need which ghetto residents have for legal service. Participation in the grievance procedures suggested above may well require legal assistance. More importantly, ghetto residents...
Page 45 - A system implies some unity of purpose and organized interrelationship among component parts. In the typical American city and state, and under federal jurisdiction as well, no such relationship exists. There is, instead, a reasonably well-defined criminal process, a continuum through which each accused offender may pass: from the hands of the police, to the jurisdiction of the courts, behind the walls of a prison, then back onto the street. The inefficiency, fallout, and failure of purpose during...
Page 42 - The institution of government that is the most constant presence in the life of the poor is the police department. Crime rates are high in the urban slums and ghettos, and the police are needed continually. As they do their job, the police carry not only the burden of the law but also the symbolic burden of all government; it is regrettable, yet not surprising, that particularly the tensions and frustrations of the poor and the black come to focus on the police. The antagonism is frequently mutual....
Page 44 - ... 41. that the federal government "allocate seed money to a limited number of state and local jurisdictions demonstrating an interest in establishing citizens' grievance agencies." 42. that there should be "extension and vigorous enforcement of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and intensified efforts to persuade all qualified citizens to vote." 43. that "we should give concrete expression to our concern about crime by a solemn national commitment to double our investment in the administration of justice...

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