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Summae Parens clementiae
Mundi regis qui machinam,
Unius et substantiae
Trinusque personis Deus,

Hymn 8
Saturday Matins

Fount and source of infinite mercy, ruler of the world's structure, God, one in nature and three in persons, in Your love graciously receive our ‘mingled penitence and praise' so that with our soul free from sin we may more fully enjoy You. Burn away with healing flames what is unhealthy in our affections and thoughts so that with loins well girt and all sinful desires cast out we may keep our prayerful vigil. May all of us who break the silence of the night with songs of praise be abundantly enriched with graces from heaven.

s Nostros pius cum canticis

Fletus benigne suscipe,
Ut corde puro sordium
Te perfruamur largius.

Lumbos jecurque morbidum 10 Flammis adure congruis,

Accincti ut artus excubent,
Luxu remoto pessimo,

Quicunque ut horas noctium

Nunc concinendo rumpimus, IS Ditemur omnes affatim

Donis beatae patriae.

Hymn 9 Te Deum laudamus, te Dominum confitemur. We praise You as God; we acknowledge You Te aeternum Patrem omnis terra veneratur.

as Lord. Tibi omnes angeli, tibi caeli et universae potestates, The whole earth reverences You, the eternal Tibi Cherubim et Seraphim incessabili voce pro- Father. All the angels, the heavens and the clamant

whole body of heavenly powers, Cherubim s Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus, Dominus Deus too and Seraphim, cry aloud unceasingly: sabaoth.

‘Holy, holy, holy Lord God of hosts. Your Pleni sunt caeli et terra majestatis gloriae tuae'. glory and majesty fill heaven and earth.' Te gloriosus apostolorum chorus,

The choir of Apostles, of glorious fame, the Te prophetarum laudabilis numerus,

band of prophets, worthy of our praise, the Te martyrum candidatus laudat exercitus.

array of martyrs, in their robes of white

all 10 Te per orbem terrarum sancta confitetur ecclesia give praise to You. The holy Church in all Patrem immensae majestatis,

parts of the earth acknowledges You, the Father Venerandum tuum verum et unicum Filium, of boundless majesty, Your adorable, true and Sanctum quoque Paraclitum Spiritum.

only Son, and also the holy Spirit, the Paraclete.

Continued

Notes on Hymn 8 Author. Unknown.

8. largius (adv, comparative), more fully, more 1. Parens. As the hymn is addressed to the three abundantly. Persons, line 4, 'Father' for Parens is ambiguous. 9. jecur, liver; regarded as the seat of the passions Fount and Source of....

and affections; morbidum, diseased, in a moral sense. 2. mundi. Quem kóquov Graeci nomine ornamenti 10. adure, burn away (as with cautery); cf. the appellaverunt, eum nos a perfecta absolutaque elegantia collect, Ure igne sancti Spiritus renes nostros et cor mundum, Plin. II, 1, 4.

nostrum. Congruis, fitting, appropriate, meeting the machinam, i.e. fabric, structure; cf. moles et machina occasion; cf. si congruam poenitentiam agant and mundi, Lucr. V, 96; also 63, 9;95, 3. Machina may also

congruas poenas (Ambrosiaster). Here the flames mean scheme, plot, as in 3 Nov., lesson 9 (St would meet the occasion if they cured the diseased Augustine).

part; healing flames. This line originally was mundique factor machinae. II. accincti with the accusative artus (cf. 3, 1). In The idea of creation would have been better left in; the original accincti referred back to lumbos. In either for factor cf. 50, 8.

case cf. sint lumbi vestri praecincti, Lk. 12, 35. Excubent; 6. fletus; cf. 5, 15 note; benigne may be a vocative, cf. 7, 4. not an adverb, W; i.e. gracious God.

14. rumpimus; cf. 4, 3, note. 7. corde puro; MSS also corda pura. Sordium; but 15. ditemur, be enriched; affatim, abundantly; cf. 2, MSS sordibus, the more usual construction after 18. purus and such words.

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Notes on Hymn 9

Author. Probably St Nicetas of Remesiana in Dacia (335-415). In this province Greek and Latin were in daily use, and Nicetas seems to have had Greek models in mind when he wrote the Te Deum. It is in rhythmical prose, and is endowed 'with a majesty and freedom that no other hymn of the Latin Church possessed' (Raby, Secular Latin Poetry, I,

except those of Advent and Lent and on feastdays.

1. Deum and Dominum are accusatives, not vocatives; as God, or, for You are God; as Lord, or, to be the Lord.

5-6. A direct quotation after proclamant.

9. candidatus, white-robed; cf. 152, 14 and Apoc. 7, 13. Lines 7-9, cf. St Cyprian, de Mortalitate (8 Nov., lesson 6).

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12. et unicum; another version is verum unigenitum.

Use. It is used at the end of Matins on all Sundays

regna caelorum.

Tu rex gloriae, Christe, Tu Patris sempiternus es You, the king of glory, Christ, are the Filius.

Father's everlasting Son. Yet, when for man's IS Tu ad liberandum suscepturus hominem, non salvation You were about to assume man's horruisti Virginis uterum.

nature, You did not shrink from entering the Tu, devicto mortis aculeo, aperuisti credentibus Virgin's womb.

You drew out death's poisonous sting and Tu, ad dexteram Dei sedes in gloria Patris; judex opened for believers the kingdom of heaven. crederis esse venturus.

You sit at God's right hand; You will, as we Te ergo quaesumus, tuis famulis subveni, quos believe, come again as Judge. pretioso sanguine redemisti.

We therefore ask this favour of You: come Aeterna fac cum sanctis tuis in gloria numerari. to Your servants' aid, for You redeemed them 20 Salvum fac populum tuum, Domine, et benedic at the price of Your blood. Bring it to pass that haereditati tuae.

they be numbered with Your saints in everEt rege eos et extolle illos usque in aeternum. lasting glory. Per singulos dies benedicimus te,

Save Your people, Lord, and bless Your inEt laudamus nomen tuum in saeculum et in saeculum heritance. saeculi.

Be a shepherd to them and bear them

up

for Dignare, Domine, die isto sine peccato nos custodire. 25 Miserere nostri, Domine, miserere nostri.

Day by day we bless You, and we praise Fiat misericordia tua, Domine, super nos, quemad- Your name for ever and ever.

. modum speravimus in te.

Deign, Lord, today to keep us without sin. In te, Domine, speravi; non confundar in aeternum. Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy on us.

May Your mercy, Lord, be upon us, as we ,

, have hoped in You.

In You, Lord, have I placed my hope; never let me be put to shame.

ever.

2. LAUDS When the name Matins was given to the vigiliary office, it could no longer be used for the morning service, whose former name was Matutini or Laudes Matutinae. From the second of these titles there was accordingly formed the new name of Laudes, Lauds. But the office did not thereby lose its character of being a morning one, as the hymns in this section clearly show.

The morning office was the normal completion of the night office and followed it without break or with but a slight break. The references in these hymns to rising must therefore be interpreted either as a continuation of the mention of this at Matins or in a spiritual sense. But the writers may well have thought, in some cases at least, of the normal sense of ‘rising'. This would certainly be true of 13, 14 and 15, which were not written for the Office but were formed out of longer hymns and then inserted into the prayer of the Church.

I

15. When you were about to take upon you various other endings are found. All these endings (suscepturus) human nature (hominem) so as to de- give the Te Deum an air of supplication and a peniliver man (ad liberandum sc. hominem). The versions tential character, and it seems that 'in the Middle 'When you took ... derive from the reading Ages it was chanted in times of great calamity, suscepisti. Horruisti, variously rendered as fear, abhor, whilst on joyous and solemn occasions the Gloria in disdain, shrink from, etc.

excelsis was sung' (Schuster, II, p. 283). This character 16. devicto; cf. devicta morte, collect Easter Sunday; is very evident in the verse translation 'Holy God, aculeo, sting, dart, of death; cf. 1 Cor. 15, 55-6. we praise thy name', where the last verse begins

17. sedes. Probably this ought to be sedens, with a ‘Spare thy people, Lord, we pray'. (Cf. Westcomma after Patris. Crederis, pass; you are believed. minster Hymnal, 187, which gives verses 1, 2, 4 and 8 18. Quos. Some join the quos ... redemisti to the

redemisti to the of this translation.) following verse Aeterna ... numerari.

20–27 are sentences from various psalms. The 19. numerari. The alternative reading munerari, to sudden transition to the singular in the last verse be rewarded, seems more likely.

suits neither the Te Deum as a whole nor 20–26. 20. Salvum fac. The verses from here to the end Some editors therefore, e.g. Phillimore, omit it from are an addition to the original composition, and

the text.

Two ideas are prominent in these hymns. Cock-crow is the theme of Aeterne rerum conditor, 11, by St Ambrose and of Ales diei nuntius, 13, by Prudentius. Who is it, asks God of Job, that has ‘put wisdom in the heart of man? Or who gave

the cock understanding?' (Job 38, 36). St Ambrose, following this idea, sees a manifestation of God's wisdom and power in the division of day and night and in the God-given instinct of the cock to announce this division. And on that simple fact joined with the story of St Peter's denial he builds up one of the most beautiful hymns of the Breviary. For simplicity and sublimity it has few rivals. However beautiful the Ales diei nuntius may be, in its full or shortened form, it pales beside the other.

Prudentius in one place likens our Lord to the cock. He is the excitator mentium, 13, 3, as the cock is to the sun, 11, 9, or to those still in bed, 11, 18. But if He is the awakener of men's souls, He is also their light, as all these hymns testify. The Matins

regna caelorum.

Tu rex gloriae, Christe, Tu Patris sempiternus es You, the king of glory, Christ, are the Filius.

Father's everlasting Son. Yet, when for man's Is Tu ad liberandum suscepturus hominem, non salvation You were about to assume man's horruisti Virginis uterum.

nature, You did not shrink from entering the Tu, devicto mortis aculeo, aperuisti credentibus Virgin's womb.

You drew out death's poisonous sting and Tu, ad dexteram Dei sedes in gloria Patris; judex opened for believers the kingdom of heaven. crederis esse venturus.

You sit at God's right hand; You will, as we Te ergo quaesumus, tuis famulis subveni, quos believe, come again as Judge. pretioso sanguine redemisti.

We therefore ask this favour of You: come Aeterna fac cum sanctis tuis in gloria numerari. to Your servants' aid, for You redeemed them 20 Salvum fac populum tuum, Domine, et benedic at the price of Your blood. Bring it to pass that haereditati tuae.

they be numbered with Your saints in everEt rege eos et extolle illos usque in aeternum. lasting glory. Per singulos dies benedicimus te,

Save Your people, Lord, and bless Your inEt laudamus nomen tuum in saeculum et in saeculum heritance. saeculi.

Be a shepherd to them and bear them

up

for Dignare, Domine, die isto sine peccato nos custodire. ever. 25 Miserere nostri, Domine, miserere nostri.

Day by day we bless You, and we praise Fiat misericordia tua, Domine, super nos, quemad- Your name for ever and ever. modum speravimus in te.

Deign, Lord, today to keep us without sin. In te, Domine, speravi; non confundar in aeternum. Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy on us.

May Your mercy, Lord, be upon us, as we have hoped in You.

In You, Lord, have I placed my hope; never let me be put to shame.

.

2. LAUDS When the name Matins was given to the vigiliary office, it could no longer be used for the morning service, whose former name was Matutini or Laudes Matutinae. From the second of these titles there was accordingly formed the new name of Laudes, Lauds. But the office did not thereby lose its character of being a morning one, as the hymns in this section clearly show.

The morning office was the normal completion of the night office and followed it without break or with but a slight break. The references in these hymns to rising must therefore be interpreted either as a continuation of the mention of this at Matins or in a spiritual sense. But the writers may well have thought, in some cases at least, of the normal sense of ‘rising'. This would certainly be true of 13, 14 and 15, , which were not written for the Office but were formed out of longer hymns and then inserted into the prayer of the Church.

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