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Decreed that whosoever should offend,
Against the well-known duties of a friend,
Convicted once should ever after wear
But half a coat, and show his bosom bare ;
The punishment importing this, no doubt,
That all was naught within, and all found out.

Oh happy Britain! we have not to fear
Such hard and arbitrary measure here;
Else, could a law, like that which I relate,
Once have the sanction of our triple state,
Some few, that I have known in days of old,
Would run most dreadful risk of catching cold;
While you, my friend, whatever wind should blow,
Might traverse England safely to and fro,
An honest man, close-buttoned to the chin,
Broad cloth without, and a warm heart within.

TRANSLATION OF

PRIOR'S CHLOE AND EUPHELIA.

Moncator, vigiles oculos ut fallere possit,

Nomine sub ficto trans mare mittit opes;
Lené sonat liquidumque meis Euphelia chordis,

Sed solam exoptant te, mea vota, Chlöe.
Ad speculum ornabat nitidos Euphelia crines,

Cam dixit mea lux, heus, cane, sume lyram. Namque lyram juxtà positam cum carmine vidit,

Suave quidem carmen dulcisonamque lyram. Fila lyræ vocemque paro, suspiria surgunt,

Et miscent numeris murmura mæs meis, Dumque tnæ memoro laudes, Euphelia, formæ,

Tota anima intereà pendet a bore Chlöes.

х

VOL. II.

Subrubet illa pudore, et contrahit altera frontem,

Me torquet mea mens conscia, psallo, tremo; Atque Capidineâ dixit Dea sincta corona.

Hea! fallendi artem quam didicere param.

TO THE

REV. MR. NEWTON.

AN INVITATION INTO THE COUNTRY

The swallows in their torpid state

Compose their useless wing,
And bees in hives as idly wait

The call of early spring.
The keenest frost that binds the stream,

The wildest wind that blows,
Are neither felt nor feared by them,

Secure of their repose.
Bat man, all-feeling and awake,

The gloomy scene surveys ;
With present ills his heart must ache,

And pant for brighter days.
Old winter, halting o'er the mead,

Bids me and Mary mourn ;
But lovely spring peeps o'er his head,

And whispers your return.
Then April, with her sister May,

Shall chase him from the bowers,
And weave fresh garlands every day, .

To crown the smiling hours.
And, if a tear, that speaks regret
Of

ier times, appear,
A glimpse of joy, that we have met,

Shall shine and dry the tear.

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TO THE

REV, WILLIAM CAWTHORNE UNWIN,

RECTOR OF STOCK IN ESSEX,

THE TUTOR OF HIS TWO SONS,

THE FOLLOWING

Poem,

RECOMMENDING PRIVATE TUITION

IN PREFERENCE TO

AN EDUCATION AT SCHOOL,

IS INSCRIBED,

BY HIS AFFECTIONATE FRIEND,

WILLIAM COWPER.

Olney, Nov. 6, 1784.

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It is not from his form, in which we trace
Strength joined with beauty, dignity with grace,
That man, the master of this globe, derives
His right of empire over all that lives.
That form indeed, the associate of a mind
Vast in its powers, ethereal in its kind,
That form, the labour of almighty skill,
Framed for the service of a free-born will,
Asserts precedence, and bespeaks control,
But borrows all its grandeur from the sou).
Hers is the state, the splendour, and the throne,
An intellectual kingdom, all her own.
For her the memory fills her ample page
With truths poured down from every distant age,
For her amasses an unbounded store,
The wisdom of great nations, now no more ;
Though laden, not encumbered, with her spoil ;
Laborious, yet unconscious of her toil;
When copiously supplied, then most enlarged;
Still to be fed, and not to be surcharged.
For her the fancy, roving unconfined,
The present muse of every pensive mind,
Works magic wonders, adds a brighter hue
To natare's scenes than nature ever knew,
At her command winds rise and waters roar,
Again she lays them slumbering on the shore;
With flower and fruit the wilderness supplies,
Or bids the rocks in ruder pomp arise.
For her the judgment, umpire in the strife
That grace and nature have to wage through life,
Quick-sighted arbiter of good and ill,
Appointed sage preceptor to the will,

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