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no confidence in the flesh, and no reliance on works. If we are in this state, we nevertheless have a faith in the appointed sacrifice for sin, which works by love, purifies the heart, and overcomes the world. Let us not then be deceived. God is not mocked. For whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that soweth to his flesh, shall of the flesh reap corruption, but he that soweth to the spirit, shall of the spirit, reap life everlasting

2. A consideration of the doctrine of the text is fitted to excite the liveliest gratitude of redeemed sinners. They know that they have not wrought their own deliverance from the power, and guilt, and condemnation of sin. They know, that it is not their own efforts which have made them to differ from such as have no hope, and are without God in the world. They know that their acceptance with God, is not owing to any inherent goodness or righteousness in themselves. They know, that it is the distinguishing grace of God alone, which has given them any purity of heart, any ground of hope and spiritual consolation. They know too, that it is by the same means only that any of those now dead in sin, can be saved. And with this deep knowledge of the heart—this sober persuasion, can they ever cease to render thankful praises to that holy one, who has purposed, and is executing this scheme of boundless grace and mercy?

“Oh! if this be truth,
No matter what is not-all-all is safe
The living light of hope creation cheers-
This is enough for creatures of the dust,
To know of their great Maker, of his will,

And providence in all their mysteries.” 3. I cannot forbear to remark in conclusion, that it may be seen from what has been said, why the impenitent either reject, or pervert this doctrine. It is a doctrine which preeminently glorifies God, and abases man. The only occasion on which Immanuel in the days of

his flesh, is said to have rejoiced, was in the contemplation of this doctrine. In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babeseven so Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight. It is a doctrine which all the ransomed of the Lord in heaven and on earth, delight to contemplate. It is a sentiment which will swell their everlasting hallelujahs. Now if sinners loved God, if they knew their own hearts, if they were humble, they too would rejoice in the doctrine, which ascribes all the glory of man's salvation to the grace of Jehovah. So that it is opposition of heart to him-it is ignorance of themselves—it is a proud and self-important spirit, which leads them to disbelieve or abuse it. Yes, it is the very state of the sinner's heart which makes his salvation depend on the truth of this doctrine, that renders him opposed to it. But what shall I say to such? I can say that this subject has not been introduced at this time, needlessly to embarrass and disturb you, but to lead you to realize your real condition. I can say, that God and his gracious method of saving sinners, will remain the same, however averse you may feel to them. I can say that if you continue through life to feel this aversion, you will most certainly fail of the joys of salvation. I can say, that because your salvation depends on the grace of the Almighty, and not on yourselves, it is possible that you may be saved. This is your only ground of hope. Will you despise it? Will you abuse it? Will you take refuge in the miserable plea for the neglect of your souls, that if this doctrine be true, no conduct of yours will alter your condition ? No one ever thought thus, or urged this plea, who really believed his salvation depended on the special mercy of God. Oh! it is a delusion of the great enemy of souls. It is a wretched refuge of lies. Will you suffer yourselves to be eternally ruined by his wiles? You are, indeed, lost sinners. But not so lost, that sovereign grace cannot reach, and save you. Not so lost as to forbid hope, if you are only willing to be saved on the humbling terms of the gospel. Here is something for you to hang a hope upon. Here is all that encourages me to come and preach to you this gospel of salvation. Did I not believe this precious doctrine, I should as soon expect that the slumbering relics of the dead in yonder grave yard, would rise into life again at my voice, as that one of you

would be saved from eternal death by my ministration of the gospel. This is my hope. My dear friends, do make it yours. Come, lost, ruined, helpless, to the Almighty Saviour. Come, resolved that you will fix all your hope of life and glory eternal on the free and distinguishing mercy of God in Christ. Come, with hearts humbled, broken, bleeding, and you shall be saved.

SERMON XXIII.

A Revival of Religion God's wonderful Work.

PSALM LXXV. 1.

UNTO THEE, O GOD, DO WE GIVE THANKS--UNTO THEE- DO WE

GIVE THANKS; FOR THAT THY NAME IS NEAR, THY WONDROUS WORKS DECLARE.

THE distinction which men gain in the intellectual world, is chiefly estimated by the extent and minuteness of their acquaintance with the laws and operations of the physical universe. They who have large views here are universally esteemed great. The field which lies open to such investigation is of unlimited extent, and they who push their inquiries the farthest, are found to ascend the highest in the scale of intellectual elevation. In this way the diversified mass of material things becomes subsidiary to the enlargement of the mental capabilities of our race. But there are other views of these works, and other works than these, which the human mind sometimes contemplates with a deeper interest and a larger benefit. They are views which recognize the wise and benevolent efficiency of the Creator. They are works which are wrought by him on the moral faculties of these very minds that are often so expanded and elevated by searching into the wonders of his visible works. And this moral operation of God on the minds of men, is greatly promoted by a constant regard to his direct agency, in working all things after the counsel of his own will, alike in the natural, intellectual, and moral world. And as in the former case, they gain the highest intellectual elevation, who extend their investigations farthest into the nature and properties of visible things; so in the latter, they make the farthest advances in moral purity, who recognize most constantly and fully the divine presence and agency in all places of his dominion. This must be evident to every one from the slightest reference to the history of spiritual piety. The truly religious of scripture history were remarkable for a quick perception of Jehovah's hand in all the varied phenomena that met their view. The text is an example of this. It is the Psalmist's grateful acknowledgment of some signal divine interposition in effecting his personal deliverance from danger. He evidently had such vivid impressions of the powerful presence of God, as could have scarcely been gained but by habits of devoutly tracing his agency not only abroad in the field of nature, but in the more special acts of his moral government. And to these habits and associations of his mind, may be referred, and by these, may be measured his unusual attainments in spiritual knowledge and purity. From these remarks it may be seen, that our highest duty, interest, and wisdom, require us to cultivate similar habits. And we have facilities which he had not. That the NAME OF JEHOVAH IS NEAR to us, is often evinced, not only by occurrences in nature and providence, but by the wonDROUS WORKS of purifying and saving souls, that are exposed to perish forever in pollution and guilt. These , works of the Lord are great, sought out of all them that have pleasure therein. And that we may all experience this pleasure, and contemplate with interest and profit these special operations of almighty Grace, I would invite your attention to a few brief remarks, introduced to illustrate the three following observations : viz.

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