Page images
PDF
EPUB

AMYNTAS.

If all the fates combine,
And all the furies join,
I'll force my way to Phillis, and break through

the charm.
[Here they break from their keepers, run to

each other, and embrace.

20

PHILLIS.

Shall I marry the man I love?

And shall I conclude my pains ?
Now bless'd be the powers above,
I feel the blood bound in my veins ;
With a lively leap it began to move,
And the vapours

leave

my

brains.

25

AMYNTAS.

30

Body join'd to body, and heart join'd to heart,
To make sure of the cure,
Go call the man in black, to mumble o'er his part.

PHILLIS.
But suppose he should stay

AMYNTAS.
At worst if he delay,
'Tis a work must be done,
We'll borrow but a day,
And the better the sooner begun.

CHORUS OF BOTH.
At worst if he delay, &c.

[They run out together hand in hand.

35

SONGS IN THE INDIAN EMPEROR.

I.

5

Au fading joy; how quickly art thou past !

Yet we thy ruin haste.
As if the cares of human life were few,

We seek out new :
And follow fate, which would too fast pursue.
See, how on every bough the birds express,

In their sweet notes, their happiness.
They all enjoy, and nothing spare ;

But on their mother Nature lay their care:
Why then should man, the lord of all below,

Such troubles choose to know,
As none of all his subjects undergo ?
Hark, hark, the waters fall, fall, fall,
And with a murmuring sound
Dash, dash upon the ground,

To gentle slumbers call.

10

15

II.

I LOOK'D and saw within the book of fate,

When many days did lour,

When lo! one happy hour Leap'd up, and smild to save the sinking state; A day shall come when in thy power

Thy cruel foes shall be ;

5

Then shall thy land be free:
And then in

peace

shall reign; But take, O take that opportunity, Which, once refus'd, will never come again.

10

SONG IN THE MAIDEN QUEEN.

I FEED a flame within, which so torments me,
That it both pains my heart, and yet contents me:
'Tis such a pleasing smart, and I so love it,
That I had rather die than once remove it.

Yet he for whom I grieve shall never know it; 5 My tongue does not betray, nor my eyes show it. Not a sigh, nor

tear, my pain discloses, But they fall silently, like dew on roses.

10

Thus, to prevent my love from being cruel,
My heart's the sacrifice, as 'tis the fuel :
And while I suffer this to give him quiet,
My faith rewards my love, though he deny it.

On his eyes will I gaze, and there delight me;
Where I conceal my love no frown can fright me:
To be more happy, I dare not aspire;
Nor can I fall more low, mounting no higher.

15

SONGS IN THE CONQUEST OF GRANADA.

I.

am,

When angry,

WHEREVER I and whatever I do,
My Phyllis is still in my mind;

I mean not to Phyllis to go,
My feet, of themselves, the way find:
Unknown to myself I am just at her door,
And, when I would rail, I can bring out no more,

Than, Phyllis too fair and unkind !

5

10

When Phyllis I see, my heart bounds in my breast,

And the love I would stifle is shown; But asleep, or awake, I am never at rest,

When from my eyes Phyllis is gone. Sometimes a sad dream does delude

my

sad mind; But, alas ! when I wake, and no Phyllis I find,

How I sigh to myself all alone!

15

Should a king be my rival in her I adore,

He should offer his treasure in vain :
O, let me alone to be happy and poor,

And give me my Phyllis again !
Let Phyllis be mine, and but ever be kind,
I could to a desert with her be confin'd,

And envy no monarch his reign.

20

Alas ! I discover too much of my love,

And she too well knows her own power!

25

She makes me each day a new martyrdom prove,

And makes me grow jealous each hour: But let her each minute torment my poor mind, I had rather love Phyllis, both false and unkind,

Than ever be freed from her power.

II.

HE. How unhappy a lover am I,

While I sigh for my Phyllis in vain;
All my hopes of delight
Are another man's right,

Who is happy, while I am in pain! 6

ShE. Since her honour allows no relief,

But to pity the pains which you bear, 'Tis the best of

your fate, In a hopeless estate,

To give o'er, and betimes to despair.

HE. I have tried the false med'cine in vain ;

For I wish what I hope not to win:
From without, my desire
Has no food to its fire ;

But it burns and consumes me within.

SHE. Yet, at least, 'tis a pleasure to know

That you are not unhappy alone:
For the nymph you adore
Is as wretched, and more;

And counts all your sufferings her own.

« PreviousContinue »