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Sigh'd and look'd, and sigh'd again : At length, with love and wine at once oppress’d, The vanquish’d victor sunk upon her breast.

VI.

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Now strike the golden lyre again :
A louder yet, and yet a louder strain.
Break his bands of sleep asunder,
And rouse him, like a rattling peal of thunder.

Hark, hark, the horrid sound

Has rais'd up his head:

As awak'd from the dead,

And amaz’d, he stares around.
Revenge, revenge, Timotheus cries,

See the Furies arise :
See the snakes that they rear,

How they hiss in their hair,
And the sparkles that flash from their eyes ! 135

Behold a ghastly band,
Each a torch in his hand!
Those are Grecian ghosts, that in battle were slain,

And unburied remain

Inglorious on the plain:
Give the vengeance due

To the gallant crew.
Behold how they toss their torches on high,

How they point to the Persian abodes,
And glittering temples of their hostile gods.
The princes applaud, with a furious joy ;
And the king seiz'd a flambeau with zeal to destroy;

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Thais led the way,

To light him to his prey,
And, like another Helen, fir'd another Troy.

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CHORUS.

And the king seiz’d a flambeau with zeal to destroy;

Thais led the way,

To light him to his prey,
And, like another Helen, fir'd another Troy.

VII.

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Thus, long ago,
Ere heaving bellows learn'd to blow,

While organs yet were mute;
Timotheus, to his breathing flute,

And sounding lyre,
Could swell the soul to rage, or kindle soft desire.

At last divine Cecilia came,

Inventress of the vocal frame;
The sweet enthusiast, from her sacred store,

Enlarg'd the former narrow bounds,

And added length to solemn sounds, With nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown before. Let old Timotheus yield the prize,

Or both divide the crown; He rais'd a mortal to the skies;

She drew an angel down.

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GRAND CHORUS.

At last divine Cecilia came,
Inventress of the vocal frame;

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The sweet enthusiast, from her sacred store,

Enlarg’d the former narrow bounds,

And added length to solemn sounds,
With nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown before.
Let old Timotheus yield the prize,

Or both divide the crown;
He rais'd a mortal to the skies;

She drew an angel down.

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VENI CREATOR SPIRITUS,

PARAPHRASED.

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CREATOR Spirit, by whose aid
The world's foundations first were laid,
Come visit every pious mind;
Come pour thy joys on humankind;
From sin and sorrow set us free,
And make thy temples worthy thee.

O source of uncreated light,
The Father's promised Paraclete !
Thrice holy fount, thrice holy fire,
Our hearts with heavenly love inspire;
Come, and thy sacred unction bring
To sanctify us, while we sing.

Plenteous of grace, descend from high,
Rich in thy sevenfold energy!
Thou strength of his Almighty hand,

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Whose power

does heaven and earth command.
Proceeding Spirit, our defence,
Who dost the gifts of tongues dispense,
And crown'st thy gift with eloquence !

Refine and purge our earthly parts ;
But, oh, inflame and fire our hearts !
Our frailties help, our vice control,
Submit the senses to the soul;
And when rebellious they are grown,
Then lay thy hand, and hold 'em down.

Chase from our minds the infernal foe,
And peace, the fruit of love, bestow;
And lest our feet should step astray,
Protect and guide us in the way.

Make us eternal truths receive,
And practise all that we believe:
Give us thyself, that we may see
The Father, and the Son, by thee.

Immortal honour, endless fame,
Attend the Almighty Father's name:
The Saviour Son be glorified,
Who for lost man's redemption died;
And equal adoration be,
Eternal Paraclete, to thee.

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V. 39. Eternal Paraclete] This is a most elegant and beautiful little morsel, and one of his most correct compositions. Its poetry and piety aid each other. Dr. J. W.

THE SECULAR MASQUE.

Enter JANUS.

JANUS. CHRONOS, Chronos, mend thy pace, A hundred times the rolling sun Around the radiant belt has run In his revolving race. Behold, behold, the goal in sight, Spread thy fans, and wing thy flight. Enter Chronos, with a scythe in his hand, and

a globe on his back, which he sets down at his entrance.

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CHRONOS.

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Weary, weary of my weight,
Let me, let me drop my freight,

And leave the world behind.
I could not bear,
Another year,
The load of humankind.

Enter Momus laughing.

MOMUS. Ha! ha! ha! ha! ha! ha! well hast thou done

To lay down thy pack,

And lighten thy back,
The world was a fool, e'er since it begun,
And since neither Janus, nor Chronos, nor I

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