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supposed to have in respect of such deed, writing, instru.

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III. And whereas it is expedient to prevent all doubts punishment respecting the civil rights of persons convicted of felonies for felony, not capital, who have undergone the punishment to which after it has been en

they were adjudged; be it therefore enacted, that where durel, shall any offender hath been or shall be convicted of any felony

not punishable with death, and hath endured or shall enpardon

dure the punishment to which such offender hath been or under the shall be adjudged for the same, the punishment so endured great seal.

hath and shall have the like effects and consequences as a
pardon under the great seal as to the felony whereof the
offender was so convicted : provided always, that nothing
herein contained, nor the enduring of such punishment,
shall prevent or mitigate any punishment to which the
offender might otherwise be lawfully sentenced on a sub-

sequent conviction for any other felony. No misde.

IV. And whereas there are certain misdemeanors which

render the parties convicted thereof incompetent witnesses, (except per- and it is expedient to restore the competency of such parties shall"render after they have undergone their punishment; be it therefore a party an enacted, that where any offender hath been or shall be incompe- convicted of any such misdemeanor (except perjury, or after he has subornation of perjury), and hath endured, or shall endure, undergone the punishment to which such offender hath been, or shali the punisb. be, adjudged for the same, such offender shall not, after

the punishment so endured, be deemed to be, by reason of
such misdemeanor, an incompetent witness in any court or
proceeding, civil or criminal.

meanor

tent witness

inent.

EXAMINATION.
(See also title Bail.")

7 Geo.4, c. 64. Before any

II. Whereas it is expedient to amend and extend the person provisions of two acts, the first passed in the first and se.. charged with felony,

cond years of the reign of King Philip and Queen Mary, &c. shall be entitled “ An Act appointing an Order to Justices of Peace bailed or for the Bailment of Prisoners," and the second passed in the committed, second and third years of the same reign, intituled “ An Act the justices

to take Examination of Prisoners suspected of Manslaughter shall take down in or Felony ;” be it therefore enacted, that the two justices of waiting the the peace, before they shall admit to bail, and the justice examination, &c.

or justices, before he or they shall commit to prison any and bind person arrested for felony or on suspicion of felony, shall witnesses take the examination of such person, and the information to appear

upon oath of those who shall know the facts and circumat the trial.

stances of the case, and shall put the same, or as much
thereof as shall be material, into writing; and the two jus.
tices shall certify such bailment in writing; and every such

to

misde

justice shall have authority to bind, by recognizance, all such persons as know or declare any thing material touching any such felony, or suspicion of felony, to appear at the next court of oyer and terminer, or gaol delivery, or superior criminal court of a county palatine, or great session or sessions of the peace, at which the trial thereof is intended to be, then and there to prosecute, or give evidence against the party accused ; and such justices and jus- Examinatice respectively shall subscribe all such examinations, in- tions, &c. formations, bailments, and recognizances, and deliver, or to be de: cause the same to be delivered to the proper officer of the

the court. court in which the trial is to be, before, or at the opening of the court.

III. And be it further enacted, that every justice of the Duty of peace before whom any person shall be taken on a charge justice on of misdemeanor, or suspicion thereof, shall take the ex.

charges of amination of the person charged, and the information upon meanor. oath of those who shall know the facts and circumstances of the case, and shall put the same, or as much thereof as shall be material, into writing, before he shall coinmit to prison, or require bail from the person so charged ; and in every case of bailment, shall certify the bailment in writing; and shall have authority to bind all persons by recognizance, to appear to prosecute, or give evidence against the party accused, in like manner as in cases of felony; and shall subscribe all examinations, informations, bailments, and recognizances, deliver, or cause the same to be delivered, to the proper officer of the court in which the trial is to be, before, or at the opening of the court, in like manner as in cases of felony.

IV. And be it further enacted, that every coroner, upon Duty of any inquisition before him taken, whereby any person shall coroner. be indicted for manslaughter or murder, or as an accessary to murder, before the fact, shall put in writing the evidence given to the jury before him, or as much thereof as shall be material, and sball have authority to bind, by recognizance, all such persons as know or declare any thing material touching the said manslaughter or murder, or the said of. fence of being accessary to murder, to appear at the next court of oyer and terminer, or gaol delivery, or superior criminal court of a county palatine, or great sessions, at which the trial is to be, then and there to prosecute or give evidence against the party charged; and every such coroner shall certify and subscribe the same evidence, and all such recognizances, and also the inquisition before him taken, and shall deliver the same to the proper officer of the court in wbich the trial is to be, before or at the opening of the court.

V. And be it further enacted, that if any justice or coro- Penalty on ner shall offend in any thing contrary to the true intent justices and and meaning of these provisions, the court, to whose officer any such examination, information, evidence, bailment,

coroners.

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recognizance, or inquisition, ought to have been delivered, shall, upon examination and proof of the offence, in a summary manner, set such fine upon every such justice or co

roner as the court shall think meet. Provisions to apply to

VI. And be it further enacted, that all these provisions all justices relating to justices and coroners, shall apply to the justices and coro

and coroners not only of counties at large, but also of all

other jurisdictions. Note. - These provisions are Lambe's case, 2 Leach, 552. Upon founded chiefly on the repealed a perusal of this case it will be statutes of 1 & 2 P. & M. c. 13, found that the reasons for that de. and 2 & 3 P. & M. c. 10. The cision still exist. It is obvious that identity of the examination ought parole evidence before a magistrate to be proved by the magistrate, co- ought not to be received until it is roner, or his clerk: i H. P. C. clearly shown not to have been re284. Under the old statutes, it duced into writing : 1 Phil. Ev. c. was held that a voluntary confes- 5. The informations against the sion of felony, made by a prisoner prisoner before a magistrate are to on his examination before a magis. be taken on oath, but the account trate, and reduced by the magis- given by the prisoner ought to be trate into writing, might be given iaken without oath. If the priin evidence at the trial, though the soner has been sworn, his statemagistrate had neglected, and the ment cannot be received: id. prisoner had refused, to sign it:

FALSE PERSONATING.
PERSONATING BAIL, &c.

21 Jac. 1, c. 26.
Whereas it is of late grown to be a great and general
grievance to his majesty's subjects within the realm of Eng-
land, and the dominion of Wales, that many lewd persons
of base condition, for very little reward or recompence,
have of late years used, and still do use, to levy fines, and
suffer recoveries of lands and other hereditaments, to ac-
knowledge statutes, recognizances, bails, and judgments, in
the name or names of any other person or persons not privy
or consenting to the same, which hath, and daily doth,
turn to the great inquietation, charge, trouble, and undoing
of many of the good subjects of this kingdom, and the
rather, for that there is no remedy in law to reform these

and the like abuses. It is felony

II. For remedy whereof, be it enacted, &c., that all and to levy a fine, suffer a

every person and persons which at any time after the end recovery,

of this present session of parliament shall acknowledge, or &c. in an procure to be acknowledged, any fine or fines, recovery or

recoveries, deed or deeds enrolled, statute or statutes, reprivy there. cognizance or recognizances, bail or bails, judgment or

judgments, in the name or names of any other person or

other's name not

to,

persons not privy or consenting to the same, and being thereof lawfully convicted or attainted, shall be adjudged, esteemed, and taken to be felons, and suffer the pains of death, and incur such forfeitures and penalties, as felons in other cases convicted or attainted, do by the laws of England lose and forfeit, without the benefit or privilege of clergy to be allowed to any such offender or offenders ; This felony provided always, that such attainder shall not be any cor- not to corruption of blood, nor loss of dower to the wife, but the next rupt the heir shall have the lands whereof such persons attainted blood, died seized, and such wife her dower, as if no such attainder had been had.

III. Provided always, and be it likewise enacted by the An attorney authority aforesaid, that this act shall not extend to any where judgjudgment or judgments acknowledged by any attorney ment is or attorneys of record, for any person or persons against given. whom any such judgment or judgments shall be had or given.

Note.—Under this act it has been the bail be filed, but only a misdeholded, that the bare personating meanor : 2 E. P. C. 109. Putting of bail before a judge at chambers, in bail in the name of persons who or the acknowledging thereof in never existed is not within the act: another name, is no felony, unless Anon, 1 Stra, 384.

por take away dower.

4 Will, and Mary, c. 4. I. [Enacts, that the judges may make any persons, ex. cept attorneys and solicitors, commissioners to take bail in the country in civil actions.]

III. [Enacts, that justices of assize may also take bail.]

IV. And be it further enacted, by the authority aforesaid, that any person or persons who shall, before any person or persons empowered, by virtue of this act, as aforesaid, to take bail or bails, represent or personate any other person or persons, whereby the person or persons so represented and personated may be liable to the payment of any sum or sums of money for debt or damages to be recovered in the same suit or action, wherein such person or persons are represented and personated, as if they had really acknowledged and entered into the same, being lawfully convicted thereof, shall be adjudged, esteemed, and taken to be felons, and suffer the pains of death, and incur such forfeitures and penalties as felons in no other cases convicted or attainted do, by the law of England, lose and forfeit.

PERSONATING SEAMEN, &c.

5 Geo. 4, c. 107. V. Whereas, it is expedient that the crimes of personating and falsely assuming the name and character of any person

money, or

entitled to prize-money or pension, for the purpose of frau

dulently receiving the same, should no longer be punished Punishment with death : be it enacted, that from and after the passof person- ing of this act, whosoever shall willingly and knowingly ating per: personate or falsely assume the name or character of any sons entitled to prize

officer, soldier, seaman, marine, or other person entitled

or supposed to be entitled to any wages, pay, pension, prizepensions, money, or other allowance of money for service done in his changed to transpor

majesty's army or navy, or shall personate or falsely astation.

sume the name or character of the executor or administrator, wife, relation, or creditor of any such officer or soldier, seaman, marine, or other person, in order fraudulently to receive any wages, pay, pension, prize-money, or other allowances of money due, or supposed to be due, for or on account of the services of any such officer or soldier, sea. man or marine, or other person, every such person, being thereof convicted, shall be liable, at the discretion of the court, to be transported beyond seas for life, or for any term of years not less than seven, or to be imprisoned only, or imprisoned and kept to hard labour in the common gaol or house of correction, for any time not exceeding seven

years. Note.-As the false personating supposed to be entitled, to receive must be done in order to receive the wages, &c., attempted to be the wages, &c., of some seaman, acquired: Brown's case, 2 E. P. C. &c., entitled or supposed to be entitled 1007. The act will apply, though thereto, there must be some evi- the personated seaman be dead, dence to show that there was such R. v. Martin, R. & R. 324; and a person of the name and character

even though, in addition to this cirassumed, who was either entitled, cumstance, the prize-money has or might, prima facie, at least be been paid: R. v. Cramp, id. 327.

FORCIBLE ENTRY.

5 Ric. 2, st. 1, c. 8. “ And also the king defendeth, that none from henceforth make any entry into any lands and tenements, but in case where entry is given by the law; and in such case not with strong hand, nor with multitude of people, but only in peaceable and easy manner. And if any man from henceforth do to the contrary, and thereof be duly convict, he shall be punished by imprisonment of his body, and thereof ransomed at the king's will.

15 Ric. 2, c. 2. Item, it is accorded and assented, that the ordinances

and statutes, made and not repealed, of them that make forcible en-. entries with strong hand into lands and tenements, or other

possessions whatsoever, and them hold with force, and also

Former statutes concerning

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riots confirmed.

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