Victory

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Doubleday, Page, 1921

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Contents

II
3
III
10
IV
21
V
28
VI
35
VII
52
VIII
58
IX
63
XXIV
224
XXV
233
XXVI
245
XXVII
250
XXVIII
260
XXIX
279
XXX
281
XXXI
290

X
65
XI
77
XII
91
XIII
98
XIV
105
XV
118
XVI
135
XVII
153
XVIII
171
XIX
173
XX
182
XXI
185
XXII
201
XXIII
216
XXXII
299
XXXIII
306
XXXIV
314
XXXV
332
XXXVI
338
XXXVII
343
XXXVIII
356
XXXIX
368
XL
376
XLI
394
XLII
403
XLIII
408
Copyright

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Page 410 - Ah, Davidson, woe to the man whose heart has not learned while young to hope, to love — and to put its trust in life...
Page xv - This bestial apparition and a certain enormous buck nigger encountered in Haiti only a couple of months afterwards, have fixed my conception of blind, furious, unreasoning rage, as manifested in the human animal, to the end of my days. Of the nigger I used to dream for years afterwards.
Page 199 - Funny position, wasn't it? The boredom came later, when we lived together on board his ship. I had, in a moment of inadvertence, created for myself a tie. How to define it precisely I don't know. One gets attached in a way to people one has done something for. But is that friendship? I am not sure what it was. I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered into his soul.
Page 94 - For every age is fed on illusions, lest men should renounce life early and the human race come to an end.
Page 167 - No, unless by native craft," said Schomberg. Ricardo nodded, satisfied. Both these white men looked on native life as a mere play of shadows. A play of shadows the dominant race could walk through unaffected and disregarded in the pursuit of its incomprehensible aims and needs.
Page 219 - Of the stratagems of life the most cruel is the consolation of love — the most subtle, too; for the desire is the bed of dreams. He turned the pages of the little volume, "Storm and Dust," glancing here and there at the broken text of reflections, maxims, short phrases, enigmatical sometimes and sometimes eloquent.
Page 3 - Victory— that we all live in an "age in which we are camped like bewildered travellers in a garish, unrestful hotel...
Page 201 - And this was true. He was still under the fresh sortilege of their common life, the surprise of novelty, the flattered vanity of his possession of this woman; for a man must feel that, unless he has ceased to be masculine. Her eyes moved in his direction, rested on him, then returned to their stare into the deeper gloom at the foot of the straight tree-trunks, whose spreading crowns were slowly withdrawing their shade. The warm air stirred slightly about her motionless head. She would not look at...
Page 113 - Schomberg's argument was met by Mr. Jones's statement that one must do something to kill time. Killing time was not forbidden. For the rest, being in a communicative mood, Mr. Jones said languidly and in a voice indifferent, as if issuing from a tomb, that he depended on himself, as if the world were still one great, wild jungle without law.
Page 187 - Do you know what I was thinking of?" he asked. "No," she said. Her tone betrayed always a shade of anxiety, as though she were never certain how a conversation with him would end. She leaned on the guard-rail by his side. "No," she repeated. "What was it?" She waited. Then, rather with reluctance than shyness, she asked: "Were you thinking of me?" "I was wondering when you would come out," said Heyst, still without looking at the girl — to whom, after several experimental essays in combining detached...

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