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232. W

PAGE White v, James

648, 649 1. Parother

632 v. Smale

648, 649 Whitehouse v. Abberley 629 Whiting v. White

308, 632 Whitley v. Lowe

590, 669 Whitstable (Free Fishers of) o. Gann 167, 171, 175, 177, 179,

184, 223 Whitton v. Peacock

333 Wickham v. Hawker 148, 158, 195,

363, 365 Widdowson v. Earl of Harring. ton

117, 332, 735, 736 Wild v. Hornby Wilkinson v. Hall 451, 463, 525

v. Proud 78, 203, 317,

335, 337, 339, 372 Willan o. Willan

745 Williams v. Bacon

48 v. Bosanquet

74 v. Griffiths

660 v. Jones

561 v. Nixon

608 v. Wilcox 166, 167, 168,

.174, 178, 179, 188 Williamson r. Naylor ..

564, 568 Willingale v. Maitland 137, 141,

143, 220 Willion v. Berkley

86, 324 Willis v. Newham

584, 589 v. Willis

300 Willoughby of Parham (Barony of)

264 Wilmot v. Corporation of Coventry

625 Wilson, Ex parte

303 In the goods of v. Eden

324 v. Kirkshaw

283 v. Mackreth 167, 169, 170 v. Master of the Rolls 268 v. Stanley 371, 373, 703 v. Tumman

628 v. Willes

210, 213 Winchcomb v. Bishop of Winton 522 Winchester's (Bishop of) case 379,

380

PAGE Windsor v. Gover

345 Winne v. Bampton

625 Winship v. Hudspeth 366, 372 Winter, Ex parte

464 v. Innes

541 Wiscot's case

455 Wishart v. Wyllie

180 Withers v. Withers

288 Wolley v. Clark 277, 278, 464, 465 Wood v. Penoyre

389 v. Tate

626 v. Waud..

157, 367, 368 Woodcock v. Gibson

144 Woodroffe v. Doe d. Daniell 458,

491, 492, 722 Woodyat v. Gresley

289 Worley v. Blunt

736, 737, 738 Worssam v. Vandenbrande 491 Wright v. Hale

693 v. Howard

157, 644 v. Rattray

225 v. Williams 366, 427, 523,

533 Wrixon v. Vize 116, 117, 309, 384,

400, 494, 495, 544, 545 Wyatt v. Hodgson 587, 600, 602 Wych v. East India Co. 268, 270 Wyllie v. Ellice

285, 286 Wynne v. Styan

280, 310

..

Y.

Yates v. Hambly

521 York (Dean and Chapter of) v. Middleburgh

677 Young v. Clare Hall 376, 380 - v. Lord Waterpark 294, 295,

386, 498, 499 v. Peachy

. 300 v. Wilton 271, 350, 497

.. 585

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Z.

Zetland (Earl of) v. Glover In

corporation of Perth .. 156

ADDENDA.

PAGE

18, n. (n).- Perhaps, however, a contract to pay within the time fixed by

the law of the land, where the contract is made, may be valid. See judgment of Cockburn, C. J., Harris v. Quine, 17 W. R.

967; 20 L. T. R., N. S. 947, S. C. 20, n. (1).-See judgment of Tindal, C. J., White v. Prickett, Arnold's

Rep. 61, 62; 4 Bing. N. C. 237, 240, S. C. 28, n. (p).-Harris v. Quine, 17 W. R. 967; 20 L. T. R., N. S. 947,

Ś. C. 127, n. (f):46 Tannt. 621. 128, n. (m):-1 H. & N. 744; Chapman v. Jones, 17 W. R. 920. 150.-The franchise of free warren, at least when it does not include the

soil, may be claimed by prescription; Co. Litt. 114 b.; or, as in the case of a several fishery, when the franchise includes the soil, and the soil can be considered as a mere adjunct. A grant of such a franchise sometimes includes, sometimes excludes, the soil. See Rice v. Wiseman, 3 Bulstr. 82; Co. Litt. 5 b.; Shep. Touch.

Prest. 96; Earl Beauchamp v. Winn, 17 W. R. 866. 150, nn. (9, t).—The King v. Mayor of Stratford-on-Avon, 14 East, 348,

362. 151, n. (-).—There is, however, great difference between an aisle and a

seat in an aisle. The seat may be since the foundation of the

church. 1 Keb. 370. 177.-It would seem that a several fishery in a tidal river is not lost or

extinguished by mere non-user, and open to the public again. Mayor of Carlisle v. Graham, Exch., Trin. Vac. 1869, not yet

reported. 179, n. (7).-So a grant of free warren of a particular kind, as conies,

would not include the soil. Earl Beauchamp v. Winn, 17 W.R.

866. 190.—The grant of “The A- Fishery” is not for any particular sort of

fish, and is equivocal. The fishery may be a free fishery or a common of fishery, or a several fishery; and by extraneous evidence before a proper tribunal the nature of it may be satisfactorily determined; but until that is done, is an undefined right; and the owner, whenever the occasion arises, must ascertain the specific character of the fishery. See Gore v. M Dermott, Ir. Rep.,

1 C. L. 348; Re Acheson's Estate, ib.; 3 Eq. Ca. 105. 191, n. (u).- On this case, see Gore v. M ́Dermott, 1 Ir. Rep., C. L. 359,

360. 195.-When a tidal river, wherein is a several fishery, changes its course,

passing through the land of a subject, and not that of the Crown, the fishery is not transferred into the new channel. Mayor of

Carlisle v. Graham, sup. 328, n. (t).-See Add. to p. 150, sup. 362, n. (a).-In the case of The Mayor of Carlisle v. Graham, sup.,

Bramwell, B., expressed an opinion that the several fishery in

question was not within any Statute of Limitation. 369, n. ().-But although a pew must be attached to a house, yet a chapel

on the soil and freehold of the owner need not. Sid. 88; Chapman v. Jones, 17 W. R. 920; O L. T. R.,

S. 811, S. C. 447, n. (g).-Smith v. Stocks, 20 L. T. R., N. S. 740. 462, n. (t).-But see Re Phæne's Trusts, 17 W. R. 1078.

L.

CORRIGENDA.

PAGE
20, n. (h). --Add, i Coop. Rep. Ch. temp. Lord Cottenham, 139.
28, n. (m). -For “Polwd.” read “Plowd.”
117, n. (v).- For “Small” read “Smales.”
128, n. (k).- For “Sticker” read “Stocker."
132, n. (x).—The same.
136, second line upwards, for “ to us a” read “to us as a.”
143, line 14, dele“ as against the Crown.”
149, n. (a).- For “Northampton” read Nottingham.”
209, commencement of the first line, read, As to."
236, n. ().- For “C. 47" read “c. 42."
324, n. (p). -For “c. 28" read "c. 26."
325, 2nd marg. ab.; for “affected” read “protected.”
367, n. (k), 368, n. ().—For “Waugh” read “Waud.”
405.-- For “ 52 H. 8, c. 9" read “ 32 H. 8, c. 2."
406, n. (a).—For “c. 4" read “c. 24.”
424, n. (e).- For 7read “6 & 7."

- For “18 Car. 2" read 17 & 18, c. 2, s. 158.427.–For the 3rd marg. ab., read The right must be lawfully claim

able." 428.- In the first marg. ab., after "and" read “the enjoyment of it be.” 460, n. (k).- For “H. 4" read “H. 7." 492.-Line 15 from the top, dele "where." 499, n. (p).- ForPhillips v. Mannings "readPhillipo v. Munnings." 505, n. (8).- For “ 2 Swanst.” read “3." 510, marg.-- For “sect. 27” read “ 26." 524.-For “ 18 Car. 2read17 & 18, c. 2, s. 158." 528, n. (a).— For “ Stamfordread “ Stanford." 548, n. (c).- For “Rockfort” read Rochfort." 564, n. (c), 568, n. (e).-For “c. 21” read “c. 16.” 570, n. (u).- For “ 8 & 9" read 7 & 8." 592, n. (d).-For “c. 28" read c. 38.” 610.–Read the first marginal abstract opposite the next paragraph.

Read the second marginal abstract opposite the third paragraph. 626.- Read the marginal abstract opposite the first paragraph in p. 627. 632, n. (e).- For “Slackhouse” read “ Stackhouse." 638.--Lines 13 and 14, dele a rent or." 643.- For “7 & 8 Vict. c. 76read “8 & 9 Vict. c. 106." 705.—For third marginal abstract, read “ exemptions." 723, n. (t).- For “Rundall” read “Randall,”

PRÉSCRIPTION

AND

TIME OF LIMITATION.

BOOK I.

PRESCRIPTION IN GENERAL.

CHAPTER I.

THE ORIGIN, THE OBJECT, AND THE MODE OF

OPERATION, OF PRESCRIPTION.

SECTION I.

The Origin of Prescription. MANKIND, before the establishment of civil society, are Importance

and benefit of commonly supposed to have had, in general, all things

prescription. in common. Civil society, however, being constituted, in however rude a form, the institution of property arises, and whatever may be the design or end of such society, order is essential to its very existence. For establishing and preserving this order the rights and duties of the individual members of such society require to be distinctly defined, and effectually maintained. In particular, the protection of those rights which arise from, or are connected with, the institution of property and the possession and the enjoyment of those things which are the objects of that institution, is a consideration of the first importance. And of all laws estab

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