Fairburn's Edition of the Trial of Sir F. Burdett, on a Charge of a Seditious Libel Agianst His Majesty's Government: Including the Defence at Full Length. Tried at Leicester, on Wednesday, the 22d of March, 1820, Before Mr. Justice Best, and a Special Jury

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Page 10 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God ; her voice the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and earth do her homage ; the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power.
Page 27 - If it were probable that every man would give his vote freely and without influence of any kind, then, upon the true theory and genuine principles of liberty, every member of the community, however poor, should have a vote in electing those delegates, to whose charge is committed the disposal of his property, his liberty, and his life.
Page 27 - The true reason of requiring any qualification, with regard to property, in voters, is to exclude such persons as are in so mean a situation that they are esteemed to have no will of their own.
Page 8 - Hounslowheath for supporting arbitrary power, gave three cheers on hearing of their acquittal. The King, startled at the noise, asked, What's that ? Nothing, Sir, was the answer, but the soldiers shouting at the acquittal of the seven Bishops.
Page 24 - ... a more equal way, by appointing more knights for every shire to be chosen, and fewer burgesses, whereby the number of the whole was much lessened, and yet, the people being left to their own election, it was not thought an ill temperament, and was [then] generally looked upon as an alteration fit to be more warrantably made and in a better time.
Page 3 - ... than Englishmen., who have done such deeds. What ! kill men unarmed, unresisting, and, gracious God ! women too ; disfigured, maimed, cut down, and trampled on, by dragoons ! ! Is this England ? This a Christian land ? A land of freedom ? Can such things be, and pass by us like a summer cloud, unheeded? Forbid it, every drop of English blood in every vein that does not proclaim its owner bastard.
Page 3 - Heath, for supporting arbitrary power, gave three cheers on hearing of their acquittal. " The King, startled at the noise, asked, ' What's that ?' ' Nothing, sir,' was the answer, ' but the soldiers shouting at the acquittal of the seven bishops.
Page 7 - Will the gentlemen of England support, or wink at such proceedings ? They have a great stake in their country ; they hold great estates, and they are bound in duty and in honour to consider them as retaining fees on the part of their country, for upholding its rights and liberties : surely they will at length awake, and find they have duties to perform.
Page 31 - In a land of liberty it is extremely dangerous to make a distinct order of the profession of arms. In absolute monarchies this is necessary for the safety of the prince, and arises from the main principle of their constitution, which is that of governing by fear : but in free states the profession of a soldier, taken singly and merely as a profession, is justly an object of jealousy.
Page 3 - Tis true, James could not inflict the torture on his soldiers — could not tear the living flesh from their bones with the cat-o'-nine tails— could not flay them alive. Be this as it may, our duty is to meet ; and England expects every man to do his duty.

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