The Christian Examiner, Volume 42

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James Miller, 1847 - Unitarianism

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Page 417 - Wilt thou forgive that sin where I begun, Which was my sin, though it were done before ? Wilt thou forgive that sin through which I run, And do run still though still I do deplore ? When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more. Wilt thou forgive that sin, which I have won Others to sin, and made my sin their door ? Wilt thou forgive that sin which I did shun A year or two, but wallowed in a score ? When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more.
Page 63 - So likewise ye, except ye utter by the tongue words easy to be understood, how shall it be known what is spoken? for ye shall speak into the air.
Page 391 - Be gracious, Heaven! for now laborious man Has done his part. Ye fostering breezes, blow ! Ye softening dews, ye tender showers, descend ! And .temper all, thou world-reviving sun, Into the perfect year...
Page 180 - Art thou too fallen, Iberia! Do we see The robber and the murderer weak as we? Thou, that hast wasted earth, and dared despise Alike the wrath and mercy of the skies, Thy pomp is in the grave, thy glory laid Low in the pits thine avarice has made.
Page 417 - Wilt thou forgive that sin which I have won Others to sin, and made my sin their door? Wilt thou forgive that sin which I did shun A year or two, but wallowed in a score? * When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more. I have a sin of fear, that when I have spun My last thread, I shall perish on the shore; But swear by thyself, that at my death thy Son Shall shine as he shines now, and heretofore; And having done that, thou hast done; I fear no more.
Page 92 - A number (not large, but of great piety and intelligence) of ministers within my acquaintance, several now dead, have been disbelievers of the doctrine in question; at the same time not feeling themselves imperatively called upon to make a public disavowal; content with employing in their ministrations strong general terms in denouncing the doom of impenitent sinners.
Page 444 - ... true eloquence I find to be none but the serious and hearty love of truth; and that whose mind soever is fully possessed with a fervent desire to know good things, and with the dearest charity to infuse the knowledge of them into others, when such a man would speak, his words...
Page 416 - And therefore is my heart oppressed With thoughtfulness and gloom ; Nor can I hope for perfect rest, Till I escape this doom. Help me, Thou Merciful and Just, This fearful doom to fly ; Thou art my strength, my hope, my trust; — O, help me, lest I die ! And let my full obedience prove The perfect power of faith and love.
Page 97 - Even this very day, when I parted with Dr. Stenson, who out of pure kindness accompanied me a long stage on the road, there was actually for a transient instant a lapse of mind into the idea of telling her how very kind he had been. I have not suffered, nor expect to feel, any overwhelming emotions, any violent excesses of grief.
Page 95 - He was remarkable for civility and kindness to small tradesmen and workpeople ; he used to complain that women were generally underpaid, and would often give them more than they asked. He abhorred driving a bargain with poor people.

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