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MISCELLANEOUS

DOCUMENTS AND RECORDS

RELATING TO

NEW HAMPSHIRE

AT DIFFERENT PERIODS:

INCLUDING

1. Journal of the N. H. Convention which adopted the Federal Constitution, 1788.
II. Journal of the Convention which revised the State Constitution in 1791-1792.
III. The Great Controversy relating to the “New HAMPSHIRE GRANTS” (so called), 1749

to 1791 ; including troubles in border towns on both sides of the Connecticut river,

1781-1783.
IV. Letters, &c., of Committee of Safety, 1779 to 1784.

V. Census of 1773.
VI. Census of 1786.
VII. Appendix, containing copies of Ancient Grants, &c., supplementary to Volume I.

PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE.

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NATHANIEL BOUTON, D.D.,
Corresponding Secretary of the New Hampshire Historical Society.

CONCORD, N. H.:
EDWARD A. JENKS, STATE PRINTER.

1877.

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JOINT RESOLUTION, passed by the Legislature of New Hampshire.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened, That His Excellency the Governor be hereby authorized and empowered, with the advice and consent of the Council, to employ some suitable person, and fix his compensation, to be paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to continue the collection, compilation, and to superintend the publication of such portions of the early State and Provincial Records, and other State Papers of New Hampshire, as the Governor may deem proper, not to exceed one volume; and that eight hundred copies of the same be printed by the State Printer and distributed as follows: namely, one copy to each City and Town in the State, one copy to such of the Public Libraries of this State as the Governor may designate, two hundred copies to the New Hampshire Historical Society, and the remainder to be in the charge of the State Librarian, who is authorized to exchange the same for similar publications issued by other States.

Approved July 18, 1876.

1

EDITOR'S PREFACE.

The publication of this tenth volume terminates my official labors as editor and compiler of the Provincial and State Papers of New Hampshire. The contents of the volume are of permanent value, including articles never before published in full. The Journal of the New Hampshire Convention in 1788, which ratified the constitution of the United States, and that of the Convention in 1791–2, which revised the state constitution of 1784, furnish the names of the distinguished men who composed those conventions, and mark an era in our history of which the state may justly be proud.

The papers relating to the long controversy with New York and Vermont, in respect of what were called the “ New Hampshire Grants,” form a mass of material which, wrought into a volume of history with like papers from other sources, will equal if not surpass any story of our early times.

The letters, orders, &c., sent out by the Committee of Safety during the latter years of the Revolution, furnish the best evidence on record of the extreme privations of the people, and the noble patriotism which animated them. The census of

1773, ordered by Governor John Wentworth, and that of 1786, ordered by the General Assembly of the state,-neither of which was ever before published, -exhibit comparatively the growth of the state between those periods, and also show how SLAVERY, as it existed in the province before the Revolution, came to a quiet end. The Constitution of 1784, in its Bill of Rights, “ spake, and it was done.” Slavery vanished without

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