John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court

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John Marshall (1755-1835) was arguably the most important judicial figure in American history. As the fourth chief justice of the United States Supreme Court, serving from 1801 to1835, he helped move the Court from the fringes of power to the epicenter of constitutional government. His great opinions in cases like Marbury v. Madison and McCulloch v. Maryland are still part of the working discourse of constitutional law in America. Drawing on a new and definitive edition of Marshall's papers, R. Kent Newmyer combines engaging narrative with new historiographical insights in a fresh interpretati.
 

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John Marshall and the heroic age of the Supreme Court

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A legal and historical scholar with particular expertise in assessing the impact of U.S. Supreme Court heavyweights, Newmyer here offers fresh insight into the life, times, contributions, and ... Read full review

Contents

Young Man of the Revolution
1
Judicial Statesman in the Making Law and Politics in the 1790s
69
Marshall Jefferson and the Rise of the Supreme Court
146
Republican Judge as Lockean Liberal
210
Constitutional Law for a New Nation
267
Embattled Chief
322
Conservative Nationalist in the Age of Jackson
386
A Judge for All Seasons
459
Essay on the Sources
487
Index
497
List of Cases
509
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

R. Kent Newmyer is professor of law and history at the University of Connecticut School of Law.

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