Lectures Introductory to the Study of the Law of the Constitution

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Macmillan and Company, 1885 - Constitutional law - 407 pages
 

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Page 252 - La libre communication des pensées et des opinions est un des droits les plus précieux de l'homme ; tout citoyen peut donc parler, écrire, imprimer librement, sauf à répondre de l'abus de cette liberté dans les cas déterminés par la loi.
Page 155 - WHEREAS the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick have expressed their Desire to be federally united into One Dominion under the Crown of the United Kingdom...
Page 150 - A final judgment or decree in any suit, in the highest court of law or equity of a State in which a decision in the suit could be had...
Page 174 - We mean, in the first place, that no man is punishable or can be lawfully made to suffer in body or goods except for a distinct breach of law established in the ordinary legal manner before the ordinary courts of the land.
Page 42 - ... this being the place where that absolute despotic power, which must in all governments reside somewhere, is entrusted by the constitution of these Kingdoms. All mischiefs and grievances, operations and remedies, that transcend the ordinary course of the laws, are within the reach of this extraordinary tribunal.
Page 44 - An Act declaring the rights and liberties of the Subject and settling the Succession of the Crown...
Page 100 - Legislature shall, in respect to the colony under its jurisdiction, have and be deemed at all times to have had full power to make laws respecting the constitution powers and procedure of such Legislature: Provided that such laws shall have been passed in such manner and form as may from time to time be required by any Act of Parliament Letters Patent Order in Council or colonial law for the time being in force in the said colony.
Page 75 - appears more surprising to those, who consider human affairs with a philosophical eye, than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few; and the implicit submission, with which men resign their own sentiments and passions to those of their rulers. When we inquire by what means this wonder is effected, we shall find, that, as force is always on the side of the governed, the governors have nothing to support them but opinion. It is, therefore, on opinion only that government is founded;...
Page 66 - America, or relates thereto, it has been declared, " that the King and Parliament of Great Britian will not impose any duty, tax, or assessment whatever, payable in any of His Majesty's colonies, provinces, and plantations in North America or the West Indies, except only such duties as it may be expedient to impose for the regulation of commerce...
Page 305 - I can, at any rate, show that the experiments made with it at the end of the seventeenth and the beginning of the eighteenth century fully confirm the high encomium bestowed by Dioscorides upon his indicum.

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