Lucretia Mott

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Feminist Press at CUNY, 1999 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 237 pages

Lucretia Mott is a genuine and underacknowledged heroine of America's early years, a woman of fierce integrity and quiet strength who played a critical role in both the anti-slavery and the woman's rights movements. In a book that combines an engaging human story with scrupulous historical research, Dorothy Sterling brings Mott to life for young readers.

The daughter of a Nantucket sea captian, Lucreatia Mott exhibited, from her earliest years, an extraordinary confidence and eloquence. As an adult, she dared to speak out to all-white, all-male audiences when women were treated as second-class citizens. She refused to be silenced when she was attacked by protestors or when meeting halls where her organizations were to gather were burned down. In her later years, Mott became an advisor to presidents and a colleague to such activists as William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, and Sojourner Truth. She was one of the most longstanding, respected, and effective voices in the movements she had helped to pioneer.

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User Review  - margarethdane141516 - LibraryThing

It's quite a good book. I admire Lucretia's courage to stand up for what she believes in and stand up after a fall. She fought for women's rights and also that of a slave's. But for a reader like me ... Read full review

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Contents

1 The Beginning
15
2 The House on Fair Street
20
3 First Lessons
27
4 Wider Worlds
32
5 New Ports
41
6 School Days
48
7 I Take Thee James
55
8 Hard Times
62
18 A Concern to Speak
129
19 Visitors
135
20 Strangers of a Certain Description
140
21 Convalescent Years
146
22 Age of Revolutions
155
23 On the Move
166
24 Roadside
174
25 James and Self
182

9 The Growingup Years
69
10 Making Things Honest
75
11 Philadelphia Winter
82
12 Remember the Slave
87
13 Philoprogenitiveness
92
14 A Searching Time
99
15 The Times That Try Mens Souls
108
16 The Worlds Convention
114
17 From Queen Victorias Land
123
26 The Day of Jubilee
190
27 The Postwar World
198
28 A Light Goes Out
205
29 I Mean to Live As Long As I Can
212
Lucretia Motts Contemporaries
221
Acknowledgments
227
Bibliography
229
Copyright

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Page 7 - They are slaves who fear to speak For the fallen and the weak; They are slaves who will not choose Hatred, scoffing, and abuse, Rather than in silence shrink From the truth they needs must think; They are slaves who dare not be In the right with two or three.

About the author (1999)

Author Dorothy Sterling was born on November 23, 1913 in Manhattan. She received a bachelor's degree from Barnard College in 1934. In the 1940's, she worked as a researcher for Life magazine, but left in frustration at a system under which women researchers gave material to men, who wrote the articles. Her first book, Sophie and Her Puppies, was published in 1951. She wrote more than 35 books for both children and adults throughout her lifetime including Freedom Train (1954), Captain of the Planter: The Story of Robert Smalls (1958), Black Foremothers: Three Lives (1979) and Close to My Heart (2005). She won numerous awards for her work including the 1976 Carter G. Woodson Book Award for The Trouble They Seen: Black People Tell the Story of Reconstruction. She died on December 1, 2008 at the age of 95.

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