Contemporary American History, 1877-1913

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Macmillan, 1914 - United States - 397 pages
 

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Page 225 - It is, of course, too early to forecast the means of attaining this last result; but the policy of the Government of the United States is to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to China, preserve Chinese territorial and administrative entity, protect all rights guaranteed to friendly powers by treaty and international law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire.
Page 15 - That all persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of inns, public conveyances on land or water, theaters, and other places of public amusement; subject only to the conditions and limitations established by law, and applicable alike to citizens of every race and color, regardless of any previous condition of servitude.
Page 69 - In countries where the common law prevails, it has been customary from time immemorial for the legislature to declare what shall be a reasonable compensation under such circumstances, or, perhaps more properly speaking, to fix a maximum, beyond which any charge made would be unreasonable.
Page 276 - The canal shall be free and open to the vessels of commerce and of war of all nations observing these Rules, on terms of entire equality...
Page 66 - Protection by the government; the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the right to acquire and possess property of every kind, and to pursue and obtain happiness and safety; subject nevertheless to such restraints as the government may justly prescribe for the general good of the whole.
Page 200 - It is because, in addition to all other grounds, its infinite resources combined with its isolated position render it master of the situation and practically invulnerable as against any or all other powers.
Page 69 - We know that this is a power which may be abused, but that is no argument against its existence. For protection against abuses by legislatures the people must resort to the polls, not to the courts.
Page 69 - To limit the rate of charge for services rendered in a public employment, or for the use of property in which the public has an interest, is only changing 'a regulation which existed before. It establishes no new principle in the law, but only gives a new effect to an old one.
Page 64 - We doubt very much whether any action of a State not directed, by way of discrimination, against the negroes as a class, or on account of their race, will ever be held to come within the purview of this provision.
Page 60 - ... no one can fail to be impressed with the one pervading purpose found in them all, lying at the foundation of each, and without which none of them would have been even suggested ; we mean the freedom of the slave race, the 'security and firm establishment of that freedom, and tho protection of the newly-made freeman and citizen from the oppressions of those who had formerly exercised unlimited dominion over him.

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