Page images
PDF
EPUB

A BRIEF BIBLIOGRAPHY

JOHN MORLEY. Burke (in the English Men of Letters

Series). This is the standard biography of Burke. JOHN MORLEY. Burke (in the Encyclopædia Britannica). JOHN MORLEY. Burke: An Historical Study. This

work deals with Burke's political side alone. LESLIE STEPHEN. History of English Thought in the

Eighteenth Century, volume ii. Burke's political theories are carefully set forth in their historical

relationships. DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY. Burke. A

valuable bibliography is attached to the biography. AUGUSTINE BIRRELL. Burke (in Obiter Dicta, second

series). WOODROW WILSON. The Interpreter of English Liberty

(in Mere Literature). A suggestive and entertaining essay. For bibliography of other essays on Burke consult Poole's Index.

The principal events of the controversy with which the Speech on Conciliation is concerned are summed up in every good history of the United States (Fiske, Andrews, Johnston). They are treated more at length in the following: W. H. LECKY. History of England in the Eighteenth

Century. GEORGE BANCROFT A History of the United States. HOSMER. Samuel Adams (in the American Statesmen

Series). J. R. GREEN. A Short History of the English People.

In the common principles of all social and civil order, Burke is unquestionably our best and wisest teacher. In handling the particular questions of his time he always involves those principles, and brings them to their practical bearings, where they most “come home to the business and bosoms of men.” And his pages are everywhere bright with the highest and purest political morality, while at the same time he is a consummate master in the intellectual charms and graces of authorship.-Hudson.

SPEECH ON CONCILIATION WITH

AMERICA

Perhaps the greatest speech Burke ever made was that on Conciliation with America; the wisest in its temper, the most closely logical in its reasoning, the amplest in appropriate topics, the most generous and conciliatory in the substance of its appeals.Morley.

SPEECH

ON

MOVING HIS RESOLUTIONS

FOR

CONCILIATION WITH THE COLONIES,

MARCH 22, 1775.

[1] I hope, Sir, that, notwithstanding the austerity

of the Chair, your good-nature will incline you to some degree of indulgence towards human frailty. You will not think it unnatural, that those who have an object depending, which strongly engages their hopes and fears, should be somewhat inclined to superstition. As I came into the House full of anxiety about the event of my motion, I found, to my infinite surprise, that the grand penal bill, by which we had passed sentence on the trade and sustenance of America, is to be returned to us from the other House. I do confess, I could not help looking on this event as a fortunate omen. I look upon it as a sort of providential favour; by which we are put once more in possession of our deliberative capacity, upon a business so very questionable in its nature, so very uncertain in its issue. By the return of this bill, which seemed to have taken

« PreviousContinue »