Reprints of Littell's Political Transactions in and Concerning Kentucky and Letter of George Nicholas to His Friend in Virginia: Also General Wilkinson's Memorial

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J. P. Morton, incorporated., 1926 - Kentucky - 172 pages
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Page 140 - The conventions of a number of the States having, at the time of their adopting the constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added...
Page 166 - And, lastly, to vindicate these rights when actually violated or attacked, the subjects of England are entitled, in the first place, to the regular administration and free course of justice in the courts of law ; next, to the right of petitioning the king and parliament for redress of grievances ; and, lastly, to the right of having and using arms for self-preservation and defence.
Page 165 - ... the judgment for the king, than ever it was after; men before pleasing themselves with doing somewhat for the king's service, as a testimony of their affection, which they were not bound to do...
Page 127 - The constitution declares that "congress shall have power to raise and support armies," an act passed by congress gives the president power "in the event of a declaration of war against the United States, or of actual invasion of their territory by a foreign power, or of imminent danger of such invasion, discovered in his opinion to exist before the next session of congress...
Page 117 - received and admitted into this Union as a new and entire member of the United States." CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA...
Page 163 - It only supposes that the power of the people is superior to both; and that where the will of the legislature declared in its statutes, stands in opposition to that of the people declared in the constitution, the judges ought to be governed by the latter, rather than the former.
Page 74 - that the use and navigation of the river Ohio, so far as the territory of the proposed state, or the territory which shall remain within the limits of this Commonwealth lies thereon, shall be free and common to the citizens of the United States...
Page 135 - He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States ; for that purpose obstructing the laws for the naturalization of foreigners, refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither and raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.
Page 119 - The western and northern extent of Virginia shall, in all other respects, stand as fixed by the Charter of King James I. in...
Page 142 - President, or to bring them, or either of them, into contempt or disrepute; or to excite against them, or either or any of them, the hatred of the good people of the United States...

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