The life and ... adventures of Robinson Crusoe, written by himself [by D. Defoe, Volume 1

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Page 43 - I stood still a few moments to recover breath, and till the water went from me, and then took to my heels and ran with what strength I had farther towards the shore. But neither would this deliver me from the fury of the sea, which came pouring in after me again, and twice more I was lifted up by the waves and carried forwards as before, the shore being very flat.
Page 43 - ... breast beat the breath as it were quite out of my body; and had it returned again immediately, I must have been strangled in the water. But I...
Page 43 - Now as the waves were not so high as at first, being near land, I held my hold till the wave abated, and then fetched another run, which brought me so near the shore that the next wave, though it went over me, yet did not so swallow me up as to carry me away, and the next run I took I got to the mainland, where, to my great comfort, I clambered up the cliffs...
Page 54 - However, upon second thoughts, I took it away, and wrapping all this in a piece of canvas, I began to think of making another raft. But while I was preparing this, I found the...
Page 140 - ... came into my thoughts by the way. When I came to my castle (for so I think I called it ever after this), I fled into it like one...
Page 140 - It happened one day about noon, going towards my boat, I was exceedingly surprised with the print of a man's naked foot on the shore, which was very plain to be seen in the sand.
Page 42 - ... went back, and left me upon the land almost dry, but half dead with the water I took in. I had so much presence of mind, as well as breath left, that seeing...
Page 141 - When I came to my castle, for so I think I called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pursued ; whether I went over by the ladder, as first contrived, or went in at the hole in the rock, which I...
Page 43 - I was now landed, and safe on shore, and began to look up and thank God that my life was saved in a case wherein there was some minutes before scarce any room to hope. I believe it is impossible to express to the life what the ecstasies and transports of the soul are when it is so saved, as I may say...
Page 187 - It came now very warmly upon my thoughts, and indeed irresistibly, that now was my time to get me a servant, and perhaps a companion or assistant, and that I was called plainly by Providence to save this poor creature's life.

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