History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, Volume 5

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Contents

Post taken at Haddrells Point 50 Troops on James Island 50 Governor
54
porary Popular Government 55 Character of Caswell 55 Hooper proposes
56
Barringtons Hesitation 57 Ministers supersede Gage 58 Hano
63
CHAPTER XLVIII
69
for every Party 71 Impartiality with regard to Men wins General Sympathy
71
The King and the East India Company 77 Advice of Hutchinson
77
Proclamation in America 82 Opinion of the Wife of John Adams 82 Mas
83
tude of George III 89 One Person sent to the Tower 89 Loyal Addresses
89
Gunning pat upon the Defensive 93 The Empress recommends Unity
97
look for Support to German Princes 106 The Ministry not Popular in Eng
107
CHAPTER LII
113
He is put in Irons and sent to England 119 Montgomery in Want of Good
119
Their Progress 125 Enos deserts 125 They reach the Portage
125
Carleton orders off all the Doubtful 129 His Means of Defence 130 Mont
131
Montgomery 137 His Character 137 Grief at his Death 137
137
Its Importance 142 Distress of the Army for Want of Supplies 142
143
resolve to take it 148 They approach the Great Bridge 149 Dunmore
150
His Difficulties 155 His Opinion in Favor of Independence
156
Cushing superseded by Gerry 162 Zeal of Samuel Adams 162 He is sec
162
StatesGeneral divided 168 Opinion of Van der Capellen 168
167
Numbers furnished by Brunswick 172 Future Life of Ferdinand 172 Fau
174
Overture of the Elector of Bavaria 179 Debate in the Commons on the Trea
181
General Confidence in his Military Abilities 186 The City reviled 187
187
of North Carolina 193 Highlanders and Regulators disarmed
193
Expectations of the Ministry 197 Consternation of the British in Boston
201
His Thrift 207 His Anger 208 His Love of Liberty 208 His Con
207
on Ways and Means 213 Drummonds Intrigues 213 Silas Deanes Char
220
by England 223 May be the Basis of a Coalition Ministry 223 Professing
229
agrees with Vergennes 230 Grimaldis Promises to share the Expense of aid
231
of Rutledge to them 237 His Advice 237 His Justification of the
239
Design against Connecticut and Rhode Island 244 Unconditional Submission
245
ruption of Europe 247 The Age worships Humanity 247 Refuses to look
248
CHAPTER LXIV
254
Resolution for Independence reported 257 And adopted 258 How it
261
adopt the New Instructions 267 Great Debate in Congress 267 The Oppo
269
North Carolina Regiments 274Orders of Lee 274 Armstrong at Haddrells
276
Parker expects Clintons Cooperation 281 Pause in the Fire
282
Messages of Wooster 287 Feeling in the Colonies 287 March of Citizens
288
ments from Washingtons Army 291 Washingtons Small Force 291
293
Attempt on Three Rivers 297 Gallantry of Wayne 298 Expedition
299
Its Firmness 305 Its Votes 305 The People consulted 305 Unanimity
305
CHAPTER LXIX
312
CHAPTER III
356
King of France 361 Danger from a Preference of Peace 361 Effect of this
362
posts of New York 367 Condition of the American Army 367 Opinion
368
Council of War inefficient 369 Governor of Connecticut 369 Rising
378
Character of General Howe 383 Delancey and Woodhull 384
384
Turgot dismissed from Office 246 De Clugny 246 Effect
388
Washington represents to Congress the Condition of his Army
392
Report of the Committee 398 Opinion of the Governor of Connecticut
398
CHAPTER VII
404
The Fisheries 409 Commissioners to France 409 Franklin and Deane
410
laration of Independence unites England 416 Speech of Cavendish 416
416
His Skill in Attack 421 Fox not a Great Man 421 His Failure as an His
422
attack East Florida 428 His March 428 He wastes his Troops 429 Goes
430
Clamors for a Separate Army 436 Division in Pennsylvania
436
Confidence of John Adams 439 British Ships ascend the Hudson 439
439
Washingtons Choice of a Camp 443 The British repulsed from Fort Washing
445
Dispositions for the Defence of Mount Washington 450 Movement of Knyp
451
tion of the Howes 457 Şubmission of Tucker 457 of Galloway 457 Hes
458
take of the Howes 458 Conquest of Rhode Island 458 Washingtons
460
CHAPTER XIII
467
an End 472 He asks for More Power 472 He remonstrates with Congress
474
Washington carries out his Plan 480 His Men and his Officers 480 The Mari
482
Approaches of the British Army 384 Necessity of a Retreat 385 Measures
483
Motion by Samuel Adams 486 Letters from Washington 486 Measures
487
Washington at Princeton 493 Battle of Princeton 493 Mercer wounded
494
CHAPTER XV
500
of electing the Governor 507 Property Qualification 507 Period of Service
508
The Free Black in New York 512 Influence of Protestantism on Freedom
516
The Friends of Choiseul 521 Interview of Fox with Franklin 521 Ameri
523
Vergennes evades Reclamations 529 His Policy the Policy of an Enemy
530
Spain unprepared for War 535 Ruined by Monopoly 535 Without
536
Margrave of Anspach 541 Feeling of the People of Ger
542
Request to Congress 548 His Request refused 549 Exchange of Prisoners
550
Interference in Philadelphia 555 Clinton on the Hudson 556 Rivalry
556
Retreat of the British 561 They reembark 562 Congress reward
563
Toryism in Philadelphia 568 Congress celebrates the Fourth of July
569
His Threats against New England 575 SaintClair selfdeceived 575 Ticon
576
Burgoyne forgives the Assassin 580 Public Opinion against
583
his Time for arriving at Albany 587 Baum sent to Bennington 587
589
of Howes Army 593 Disaffection in Maryland and Delaware 594 Penn
595
John Adams blames Washington 601 Howe crosses the Schuylkill 601
601
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Page 261 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 321 - The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward, forevermore.
Page 260 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity ; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 321 - You will think me transported with enthusiasm ; but I am not. I am well aware of the toil, and blood, and treasure that it will cost us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet, through all the gloom, I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.
Page 261 - That elections of members to serve as representatives of the people, in assembly, ought to be free; and that all men, having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to, the community, have the right of suffrage, and cannot be taxed or deprived of their property for public uses without their own consent, or that of their representatives so elected, nor bound by any law to which they have not, in like manner, assented, for the public good.
Page 102 - England will ere long repent of having removed the only check that could- keep her colonies in awe. They stand no longer in need of her protection ; she will call on them to contribute towards supporting the burdens they have helped to bring on her ; and they will answer by striking off all dependence.
Page 565 - that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Page 161 - O ! ye that love mankind ! Ye that dare oppose not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth ! Every spot of the old world is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the Globe. Asia and Africa have long expelled her. Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart. O ! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.
Page 215 - European maritime powers still 1776. encouraged was absolutely forbidden, not from political reasons merely, but from a conviction of its unrighteousness and cruelty ; and without any limitation as to time, or any reservation of a veto to the respective colonies, it was resolved, " that no slaves be imported into any of the thirteen United Colonies.
Page 88 - Believe me, dear sir, there is not in the British Empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this I think I speak the sentiments of America.

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