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would meet with my fervent desires; desires which I have reason to believe are inspired by the Spirit of God. I believe I have no other end in view, than to do all the good I can while I live. This is not a transient desire, but what I may presume to say is the constant bent of my mind. I feel this inclination in my darkest and most tried states of mind, and more especially when the tide of Divine love runs high. However, the feelings of my soul are not altogether decisive in the matter : I believe there is in most cases an outward as well as an inward call; and on that ground, I wish your advice, as you are the first, next to my wife, that I have spoken to upon the subject. Having a wife and three children, I feel some reluctancy in mentioning my case to Mr. R. However, as you are better acquainted with these matters than myself, and as I shall pay some attention to your advice, I hope you will write soon, and tell me all that is necessary upon the subject."

The following letter to the same friend, dated January 20, 1799, serves to shew us the state of Mr. Welch's mind at that time, and in some measure supplies the chasm found in his diary.

Birmingham, January 20, 1799. “My dear Brother,

" I hope you will pardon my long silence. I mean to write more frequently, and I should have written many months sooner, had I not had some intention of going over to Nottingham at my Christmas vacation, and of spending about a week in your circuit; but I have been providentially prevented. The change and trouble consequent on moving three times in about seven years, have been each time accompanied with the loss of a measure of grace and comfort. How do the things of life weigh down the soul ! Help me by your prayers to recover my loss. I am verging towards forty, and o! how small are my attainments ! Were death to make its approach, I am afraid it would wear a gloomy aspect, not through a fear of missing heaven, but of coming short, very short, of some of those higher degrees of glory to which a higher degree of holiness would intitle me. O ! my brother, remember an old friend, when you are besieging the throne of grace. I am far from being so holy, so happy, or so useful as I might have been. I hope, God owns your labours abundantly, and makes you a blessing to the church of God, and also to your family. “I am your very affectionate brother,

“T. WELCH." He again resumes his diary, by recording the death of his wife.

“ Birmingham, October 25, 1801. Eleven years have elapsed since I recorded in my journals any account of the dealings of God with me. O what a multitude of trials, temptations, com.

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Save a. Mifrenary in . Areá' Scia.se .

THE

METHODIST MAGAZINE,

FOR JUNE, 1817.

BIOGRAPHY.
MEMOIR OF MR. THOMAS WELCH,

Late of STOURPORT, WORCESTERSHIRE.

(Continued from page 331.) Mr. W. was now laborious in preaching the word of life, frequently travelling many miles, and speaking twice or thrice on i the Lord's day. He also diligently redeemed his time, and ardently panted for that knowledge and experience necessary to. make " a good minister of Jesus Christ;" and by reading, study, and prayer, his profiting appeared to all.

“ November 9. l'attempted preaching at the room last night, for the first time, after travelling about thirteen miles, and preaching twice. Before I began, I was but just able to bear up under the thought; but my God was with me of a truth; he gave me sweet peace und liberty: how'shall I praise him as he deserves ! He gave me favour in the eyes of the people. O that it may be a means of my rendering humble acknowledgements and thank ; fulness to God. The success, as well as the pleasure of preaching, depends principally on God's presence, at the time of delivery. The difference between my first and last sermon yesterday is an evidence of this. Lord preserve thy servant unto eternal life.

“ November 24. Last night I preached at the room, but my mind was in a measure confused all the time I was preaching, although I had used much more labour in preparing, than I did the former time. But my Lord knows how to deal with his unworthy creature.

“ February 2, 1789. A month of the new year hath elapsed, and though I purposed to devote myself wholly to God this year, yet my conduct hitherto hath given no great proof of it. I have to praise my God, however, that in labouring for him yesterday, I found my strength equal to ny day; He gave me sweet liberty of mind and speech, at the room in the evening. VOL. XL. JUNE, 1817.

“ Dec. 9. Many troubles, and many comforts ; many temptations, and many deliverances, have, alternately, been my portion during the last year. And while I have had cause for mourning, from a deep consciousness of my imperfections, my soul hath exclaimed, • Oh, how good, how heavenly, how precious, is the love of Christ to my soul !

"May 3, 1790. Though conscious of coming short of the whole image of God, and the full requirements of the gospel, yet I have felt many refreshing seasons since the above date: his wonderful condescension sinks me into the dust. 24. Being deeply conscious of the imperious command, · Be ye holy, for I am holy;' and of the extent of the promisc, 'He is able to save to the uttermost all that come to God by him,' I have this day determined on an entire surrender of my heart to God, and a more than ordinary exercise of my whole soul in subjection to his will: and for this purpose I intend to read, for some time, only what has a tendency to inflame my affections, and to engage all my powers in the Divine service.

“ June 28. I spent several hours in devotional reading and prayer; but felt little encouragement, through a suggestion in my mind, that I was seeking to be holy by prayer and reading, and not by Christ. Thus satan would make the means and the end go to war with each other. What God hath joined together let no one put asunder,

“October 18. My business, family, and the church of God, have often presented scenes of a very trying nature, within the last three months; but they have been interspersed with much “ peace and joy through believing:"-We now find that a long interval of time elapsed, without his having made any entry in his diary. No express reason is assigned for this; but a multiplicity of business and domestic cares appear to have been the cause. How necessary is it for the people of God constantly to watch against the encroachments of the world, that while they are laudably diligent in business, they may continue to maintain fervour of spirit.

In June 1791, our friend removed to Birmingham, where he opened a school, and met with considerable encouragement. He still continued to preach with great acceptance in a local capacity, and began to feel an ardent desire after more extensive usefulness. This led him to entertain serious thoughts of offering himself to Conference; but fearing at the same time (on account of financial matters) his family might be objected to, he opened his mind freely to his confidential friend, Mr. Reynolds, and solicited his advice. An extract from his letter on this subject is subjoined. It is dated Oct. 6, 1794. “I must tell you what has occupied my thoughts for a considerable time, and what impresses my mind with a great degree of seriousness. If my brethren in Conference would have no objection to make trial of me, as an itinerant preacher, it

would meet with my fervent desires; desires which I have reason to believe are inspired by the Spirit of God. I believe I have no other end in view, than to do all the good I can while I live. This is not a transient desire, but what I may presume to say is the constant bent of my mind. I feel this inclination in my darkest and most tried states of mind, and more especially when the tide of Divine love runs high. However, the feelings of my soul are not altogether decisive in the matter : I believe there is in most cases an outward as well as an inward call; and on that ground, I wish your advice, as you are the first, next to my wife, that I have spoken to upon the subject. Having a wife and three children, I feel some reluctancy in mentioning my case to Mr. R. However, as you are better acquainted with these matters than myself, and as I shall pay some attention to your advice, I hope you will write soon, and tell me all that is necessary upon the subject.”

The following letter to the same friend, dated January 20, 1799, serves to shew us the state of Mr. Welch's mind at that time, and in some measure supplies the chasm found in his diary.

Birmingham, January 20, 1799. « My dear Brother,

" I hope you will pardon my long silence. I mean to write more frequently, and I should have written many months sooner, had I not had some intention of going over to Nottingham at my Christmas vacation, and of spending about a week in your circuit; but I have been providentially prevented. The change and trouble consequent on moving three times in about seven years, have been each time accompanied with the loss of a measure of grace and comfort. How do the things of life weigh down the soul ! Help me by your prayers to recover my loss. I am verging towards forty, and how small are my attainments! Were death to make its approach, I am afraid it would wear a gloomy aspect, not through a fear of missing heaven, but of coming short, very short, of some of those higher degrees of glory to which a higher degree of holiness would intitle me.' O ! my brother, remember an old friend, when you are besieging the throne of grace. I am far from being so holy, so happy, or so useful as I might have been. I hope, God owns your labours abundantly, and makes you a blessing to the church of God, and also to your family. “I am your very affectionate brother,

“T. WELCH." He again resumes his diary, by recording the death of his wife.

“ Birmingham, October 25, 1801. Eleven years have elapsed since I recorded in my journals any account of the dealings of God with me. O what a multitude of trials, temptations, com

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