Slavery and the Commerce Power: How the Struggle Against the Interstate Slave Trade Led to the Civil War

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Yale University Press, Jan 1, 2006 - Social Science - 228 pages
Despite the United States' ban on slave importation in 1808, profitable interstate slave trading continued. The nineteenth century's great cotton boom required vast human labor to bring new lands under cultivation, and many thousands of slaves were torn from their families and sold across state lines in distant markets. Shocked by the cruelty and extent of this practice, abolitionists called upon the federal government to exercise its constitutional authority over interstate commerce and outlaw the interstate selling of slaves. This groundbreaking book is the first to tell the complex story of the decades-long debate and legal battle over federal regulation of the slave trade.
 

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Contents

1 A Continual Torment
1
2 This Blind Mysterious Form of Words
16
3 Are They Not the Lords Enemies?
37
4 Different Opinions at Different Times
65
5 The Door to the Slave Bastille
90
6 Little Will Remain to Be Done Except to Sing Te Deum
113
7 Great and Terrible Realities
140
8 The Friction and Abrasion of War
165
Notes
181
Index
220
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