The history of sir Charles Grandison, Volume 2

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Page 230 - I am afraid my uncle will think himself justified by them on this occasion, when he asserts, that it is one of the most difficult things in the world to put a woman right, when she sets out wrong.
Page 116 - Short is the lesson, tho' my lecture long, Be good — and let heaven answer for the rest. Yet, with a sigh o'er all mankind, I grant, In this our day of proof, our land of hope, The good man has his clouds that intervene ; Clouds, that obscure his sublunary day, But never conquer : ev'n the best must own, Patience, and resignation, are the pillars Of human peace on earth.
Page 171 - For this is thankworthy, if a man for conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully. For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently f but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.
Page 12 - Sir Charles Grandison/ Harriet Byron says, in one of her letters to Lucy Selby, " I am very much mistaken, if every woman would not find her account, if she wishes herself to be thought well of, in discouraging every reflection that may have a tendency to debase or expose the sex in general. How can a man be suffered to boast of his vileness to one woman in the presence of another, without a rebuke, that should put it to the proof whether the boaster was or was not past blushing ? " Few women, in...
Page 11 - ... themselves, for a good deal more. But let not those worthy young women, who may think themselves destined to a single life, repine over-much at their lot; since, possibly, if they have had no lovers, or having had one, two, or three, have not found a husband, they have had rather a miss than a loss, as men go.

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