The Constitutional History of England: From the Accession of Henry VII, to the Death of George II, Volume 4

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Page 272 - Britain ; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, had, hath, and of right ought to have, full Power and Authority to make Laws and Statutes of sufficient Force and Validity to bind the Colonies and People of America, Subjects of the Crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.
Page 272 - Ireland have not nor of right ought to have any jurisdiction to judge of, reverse, or affirm any judgment, sentence, or decree given or made in any court within the said kingdom ; and that all proceedings before the said House of Lords upon any such judgment, sentence, or decree are and are hereby declared to be utterly null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.
Page 262 - THE Roman Catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland : or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles the Second...
Page 262 - Catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland : or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles the Second : and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman Catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Page 83 - that the presence of a regular body of armed soldiers at an election of members to serve in Parliament is a high infringement of the liberties of the subject, a manifest violation of the freedom of elections, and an open defiance of the laws and constitution of this kingdom...
Page 49 - My lords, if ministers of state, acting by the immediate commands of their sovereign, are afterwards to be made accountable for their proceedings, it may one day or other be the case of all the members of this august assembly.
Page 2 - ... privileges. The battle had been fought and gained ; the statute-book , as it becomes more voluminous , is less interesting in the history of our constitution ; the voice of petition , complaint , or remonstrance is seldom to be traced in the journals; the crown in return...
Page 177 - Glenco, and that tribe, can be well separated from the rest, it will be a proper vindication of the public justice to extirpate that sect of thieves...
Page 264 - To have exterminated the catholics by the sword, or expelled them, like the Moriscoes of Spain, would have been little more repugnant to justice and humanity, but incomparably more politic.
Page 222 - ... service, and brought them to a place of meeting, where your garrison soldiers were appointed to be, who have there most dishonourably put them all to the sword : and this hath been by the consent and practice of the lord deputy for the time being.

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