Correspondence of John, Fourth Duke of Bedford, Volume 2

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1843
 

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Page 190 - He made an administration so checkered and speckled ; he put together a piece of joinery so crossly indented and whimsically dovetailed, a cabinet so variously inlaid, such a piece of diversified mosaic, such a tesselated pavement without cement, — here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white, patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans, whigs and tories, treacherous friends and open enemies, — that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to...
Page 190 - ... a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic ; such a tesselated pavement Without cement ; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white ; patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans ; whigs and tories ; treacherous friends and open enemies : that it was indeed a very curious show 5 but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 127 - Silence, ye wolves ! while Ralph to Cynthia howls And makes night hideous — Answer him, ye owls ! " Sense, speech, and measure, living tongues and dead, Let all give way, and Morris may be read.
Page 312 - Majesty's information the names of such persons, if any such shall occur to me, as shall be most capable and best qualified, from their abilities, credit, and connections, to strengthen and promote his Majesty's service. As it is absolutely necessary, to enable me to be of any service to the King in this country, that the secret despatches which are to come from you to me be kept inviolably so, I must most earnestly entreat that the contents of them may not be sent to individuals here, as the present...
Page 187 - This thunderbolt, thrown in a sky so long serene, confounded the audience. Murray crouched silent and terrified. Legge scarce rose to say, with great humility, ' that he had been raised solely by the whigs, and if he fell, sooner or later, he should pride himself in nothing but in being a whig.
Page 189 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic; such a tesselated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white; patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans; whigs and tories; treacherous friends and open enemies : that it was indeed...
Page 187 - Pitt, who was in the gallery, started, and came down with impetuosity, and with all his former fire said, ' He had asked what occasioned such an uproar : lamented to hear a laugh on such a subject as bribery! Did we try within the house to diminish our own dignity, when such attacks were made upon it from -without ? That it was almost lost!
Page 95 - He placed his honour in steady addiction to whatever faction he was united with ; and, from the gaiety of his temper, having indulged himself in profuse drinking, he was often hurried beyond the bounds of that interest which he meant should govern all his actions, and which his generous extravagance for ever combated. In short, he was a man who was seldom liked or hated with moderation ; yet he himself, though a violent opponent, was never a bitter enemy. His amiable qualities were all natural; his...
Page 91 - Legge was duped and ill treated by him. Having shuffled for some time between Mr. Pelham, Pitt, the Duke of Bedford, and Lord Sandwich, and wriggled through the interest of all into the Treasury, and then to the treasurership of the navy, he submitted to break his connections with the two latter by being the indecent messenger of Lord Sandwich's disgrace. The Duke met him on the steps of...

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