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BISHOP BURNET.

Died March 17th, 1714-15, aged 71-2.

Ye know not what shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? it is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away.

Jan. iv. 14.

An eminent theological and historical writer, and a very pious and active prelate. In March 1714 or 1715, being in the 72nd year of his age, the Bishop was taken ill of a violent cold, which soon turned to a pleuritic fever : he was attended in it by his worthy friend and relation Dr. Cheyne, who treated him with the utmost care and skill; but finding the distemper grew to a height which seemed to baffle all remedies, he called for the assistance of Sir Hans Sloane and Dr. Mead, who quickly found his case was desperate. His character was too well known to induce any one to conceal from him the danger his life was in ; he bore the notice of it with that calm resignation to Providence which had always supported him under the severest trials. As he preserved his senses to the last, so he employed the precious remnant of life in continual acts of devotion, and in giving the best advice to his family; of whom he took leave in a manner that shewed the utmost tenderness, accompanied with the firmest constancy of mind. And whilst he was so little sensible of the terrors of death as to embrace its approach with joy, he could not but express a concern for the grief he saw it caused in others. A short time before his death, this good man thus wrote, “ True religion is a perfection of human nature, and the joy and delight of every one that feels it active and strong within him. Of this I write with the more concern and emotion, because I have felt this the true, and indeed, the only joy which runs through a man's heart and life. It is that which has been for many years my greatest support, I rejoice daily in it, I feel from it the earnest of that supreme joy, which I pant and long for, and I am sure there is nothing else which can afford any true or complete happiness *."

BISHOP KEN.

Died March 19, 1710-11, aged about 73.

worms.

I look into the graves of my ancestors, and find there dust and What I now am,

these

very lately were ; and what they are now, I shall as certainly be in a little time.

St. BERNARD.

One of the most pious divines of the English Church. On Monday he was confined to his bed, and on the Monday following, March 19, his soul was set free. He was remarkably patient in his sickness; and when upon his own inquiry of his physician, how many days he thought he might probably live ? desiring him to speak plainly and freely, and telling him he had

* T. Burnet.

no reason to be afraid of dying, and being by him answered about two or three days; his only reply was, (his usual expression, and that without the least concern,) “God's will be done;" desiring that no application might be made to cause him to linger in pain. It can be no wonder he should so little regard the terrors of death, who had for many years travelled with his shroud in his portmanteau, as what he often said might be as soon wanted as any other of his habiliments, and which was by himself put on as soon as he came to Long Leat, giving notice of it the day before his death, by way of prevention, that his body might not be stripped. He dozed much the day or two before he died. He was buried at Froome Selwood, it being the nearest parish within his own diocese to the place where he died, as by his own request, in the church-yard, under the east window of the chancel, just at sun-rising, without any manner of pomp or ceremony, besides that of the order for burial in the Liturgy of the Church of England *

* W. Hawkins, Esq., Middle Temple.

AN

others. A short time before his death, this good man thus wrote, “ True religion is a perfection of human nature, and the joy and delight of every one that feels it active and strong within him. Of this I write with the more concern and emotion, because I have felt this the true, and indeed, the only joy which runs through a man's heart and life. It is that which has been for many years my greatest support, I rejoice daily in it, I feel from it the earnest of that supreme joy, which I pant and long for, and I am sure there is nothing else which can afford any true or complete happiness.”

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BISHOP KEN.

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Died March 19, 1710-11, aged about 73.

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worms.

I look into the graves of my ancestors, and find there dust and

What I now am, these very lately were ; and what they are now, I shall as certainly be in a little time.

Sr. BERNARD.

Mer of * for

One of the most pious divines of the English Church. On Monday he was confined to his bed, and on the Monday following, March 19, his soul was set free. He was remarkably patient in his sickness; and when upon his own inquiry of his physician, how many days he thought he might probably live ? desiring him to speak plainly and freely, and telling him he had

T. Burnet.

375

no reason to be afraid of dying, and being by him answered about two or three days; his only reply was, (his usual expression, and that without the least concern,) “God's will be done;” desiring that no application might be made to cause him to linger in pain. It can be no wonder he should so little regard the terrors of death, who had for many years travelled with his shroud in his portmanteau, as what he often said might be as soon wanted as any other of his habiliments, and which was by himself put on as soon as he came to Long Leat, giving notice of it the day before his death, by way of prevention, that his body might not be stripped. He dozed much the day or two before he died. He was buried at Froome Selwood, it being the nearest parish within his own diocese to the place where he died, as by his own request, in the church-yard, under the cast window of the chancel, just at sun-rising, without any manner of pomp or ceremony, besides that of the order for burial in the Liturgy of the Church of England *

• W. Hawkins, Esq., Middle Temple.

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