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I doubt not but, upon an impartial view of the whole, it will appear, that we have all the reason in the world firmly to assent to the truth of Christianity; and consequently to this article which comprehends it all, that Jesus Christ is the mediator between God and man.

THE END OF THE SECOND PART,

OF

THE CHRISTIAN LIFE.

PART III.

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TO THE

RIGHT HONOURABLE

SIR GEORGE TREBY,

LORD CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE COMMON-PLEAS.

MY LORD, THOSE excellent treatises of Christian Life, which were published some years since by the learned author, have, I doubt not, in a great measure answered his design in writing them, which was to do as much good as he could to the world; and had he lived to finish the other parts of it, we might have had such a complete body of Christian institutions in our own language, as would have highly contributed towards a revival of true piety among us. For, besides those pieces which have already seen the light, it was the author's design to proceed to a particular explication of the several respective duties which men are obliged to render to God, their neighbours, and themselves; and for a conclusion of all, he proposed a distinct treatise of ecclesiastical duties.

The two discourses of Justice and Mercy, which I now present to your Lordship, were intended as a part of that duty which we owe to one another, and which, with other enlargements, had the author lived, would have made a volume of themselves. And the discourse of Mortification is likewise a part of what he designed for the explication of that duty which man owes himself, which was also intended for another distinct volume. Besides these, he proposed a particular examination of those great duties which God requires; which, together with the other volumes, would have completed the whole design. In justice therefore to the memory of this incomparable person, I thought myself obliged to communicate to your Lordship this short account of him. The design which he proposed was great and noble; and I am sure those pieces which he hath already published do loudly speak the excellent qualifications with which God had endowed him to complete it, had not a laborious station, and, what was worse, a very sickly constitution, at last interrupted him from the prosecution of it.

As for these remains, they are faithfully transcribed from the author's manuscript; and your Lordship may easily discern that they are his true and genuine offspring by your perusal of them. I know your Lordship hath a very high value and just esteem for the memory of that great and good man, and that is a prevailing inducement to take into your protection those works which he hath left behind him. To you they address themselves; and I

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