English party leaders and English parties, from Walpole to Peel, Volume 2

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1878
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Page 262 - In matters of commerce, the fault of the Dutch Is giving too little and asking too much; With equal advantage the French are content: So we'll clap on Dutch bottoms a twenty per cent. Twenty per cent, Twenty per cent, Nous frapperons Falck with twenty per cent.
Page 106 - The resources created by peace are means of war. In cherishing those resources, we but accumulate those means. Our present repose is no more a proof of inability to act, than the state of inertness and inactivity in which...
Page 371 - I do not mean to be disrespectful, but the attempt of the Lords to stop the progress of reform, reminds me very forcibly of the great storm of Sidmouth, and of the conduct of the excellent Mrs. Partington on that occasion. In the winter of 1824, there set in a great flood upon that town — the tide rose to an incredible height — the waves rushed in upon the houses, and everything was threatened with destruction. In the midst of this sublime and...
Page 365 - I exhort you not to reject this measure. By all you hold most dear — by all the ties that bind every one of us to our common order and our common country, I solemnly adjure you — I warn you — I implore you — yea, on my bended knees, I supplicate you — reject not this Bill...
Page 106 - You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness — how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion ; how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage ; how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its, scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Page 106 - ... assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion, how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage, how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder. Such as is one of...
Page 242 - If France occupied Spain, was it necessary, in order to avoid the consequences of that occupation — that we should blockade Cadiz ? No. I looked another way — I sought materials of compensation in another hemisphere. Contemplating Spain, such as our ancestors had known her, I resolved that if France had Spain, it should not be Spain " with the Indies" I called the New World into existence, to redress the balance of the Old.
Page 372 - By union, justice, reason, law, We claim the birthright of our sires. We raise the watchword, Liberty ! We will, we will, we will be free ! Towards the close of the meeting a solemn scene was witnessed.
Page 283 - As a scholar he was greatly my superior; as a declaimer and actor, I was reckoned at least his equal ; as a schoolboy, out of school, I was always in scrapes, and he never; and in school, he always knew his lesson, and I rarely, — but when I knew it, I knew it nearly as well. In general information, history, etc. etc., I think I was his superior, as well as of most boys of my standing.
Page 280 - I never knew a man in whose truth and justice I had a more lively confidence, or in whom I saw a more invariable desire to promote the public service. In the whole course of my communication with him I never knew an instance in which he did not show the strongest attachment to truth; and I never saw in the whole course of my life the smallest reason for suspecting that he stated anything which he did not firmly believe to be the fact.

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